Cue Ball Control 101: Draw, Follow and Stop Shots in Pool

Cue Ball Control 101: Draw, Follow and Stop Shots in Pool

“With the exception of stroke speed, the ability to draw or follow the cue ball is more important than any other component in maintaining control of the cue ball.” Willie Mosconi on the sport of pocket billiards.

What is Cue Ball Control?

In the pool hall, if you’ve ever played against a strong pool player, you’ve probably seen how they prepare for each shot by moving the cue ball about the table. They employ the same techniques to leave you with difficult shots after a miss. However, despite the fact that it appears to be difficult at times, cue ball handling is actually not that difficult. It’s one of the most fundamental pool abilities that every player can acquire and master. In order to control where the cue ball moves after it strikes the object ball, there are three major stroke styles to use: the draw, the follow, and the stop shot.

The next sections will cover the specifics of executing each of these strokes, as well as some extra resources at the conclusion for more reading.

As you learn how to play pool, make an effort to put these strokes into practice on a regular basis.

Center-Ball Stroking

“By stroking the cue ball in the center, you can make more than 85 percent of your shots.” “Whenever feasible, strike the middle of the ball with your bat.” — Willie Mosconie We’ll start with the fundamentals of where to strike the cue ball in order to maintain basic cue ball control before moving on to draw, follow, and stop shot techniques. As you go through the strokes listed below, you’ll note that we refer to striking the cue ball “above” or “below” the center line on each occasion. The term “center” is used to refer to the horizontal axis of the cue ball in these examples.

Using a right-handed stroke will cause the cue ball to spin left (or counter-clockwise), while using a left-handed stroke will make the cue ball to spin right (or clockwise) (clockwise).

After the cue ball has hit a rail, English can also modify the angle at which it is thrown.

However, for the time being, we’ll remain with the fundamentals of drawing, following, and stopping.

The Draw Shot

When you wish to control the cue ball by dragging it back after it makes contact with your object ball, you use the draw shot.

In pool, this is a shot that is frequently used for placement. Ideally, you want to knock the cue ball low enough that it will draw its own weight rearward.

Where to Strike the Cue Ball

To perform a draw shot, you need aim at least a cue tip’s width below the center of the target. More draw can be achieved by aiming lower on the cue ball, although this should not be more than the width of a cue tip and a half. It is possible to enhance the pull by aiming lower or hitting with greater power. Following the cue ball stroke, move the cue ball 4 – 6 inches past the point of contact and towards the object ball to ensure a good connection with it. When completing a draw shot, you will frequently be required to lift your cue.

You must first establish a sturdy bridge in order to grip the cue securely and comfortably in order to perform this successfully.

Practicing the draw shot

It is simple to practice the draw shot by shooting for an object ball and drawing the ball back from various distances. Make an effort to draw it a little bit further each time. With practice, you will be able to gauge just how low and how hard you should strike in order to produce the proper draw. Then experiment with drawing from various distances. With longer shots, you’ll discover that it’s more difficult to perform a draw shot. If you want to get additional backspin, you’ll need to strike hard below the center line.

The Follow Shot

The follow shot is the inverse of the draw shot in terms of execution. Attempting to keep the cue ball rolling ahead after it makes contact with the object ball is the goal of a follow shot. Following the cue ball into a rail with some topspin, for example, is a beneficial technique when you need to bring the cue ball down to the other end of the table after a shot is made. Depending on whether you’re playing offense or defense, you may want to do this in order to set up your next shot or to leave your opponent with a more difficult shot.

Where to Strike on the Cue Ball

In order to achieve the best results with a follow shot, you should always aim just a cue tip’s width above center on the cue ball. In most cases, there is no reason to aspire higher. If you want more follow, simply increase the force with which you strike the ball. Because aiming too high increases the likelihood of losing stroke speed and miscuing.

How to Practice Follow Shots

Changing the distance the cue ball goes after each stroke is a simple approach to practice follow shots and is recommended for beginners. You may start with short follows and progress to follows with a bank as your skill level increases. Once you’ve gotten a feel for the game, you may experiment with follow shots that will send the cue ball off the rail and to the other end of the table. Additionally, experiment with different stroke speeds to observe how they affect the course of the cue ball.

The Stop Shot

The purpose of the stop shot is to simply bring the cue ball to a complete stop once it has made contact with the object ball during the stroke.

Okay, so we didn’t pause the video when the cue balldeadin came on. Nonetheless, the movement of the cue ball is kept to a minimum, which is frequently the aim when setting up for the following easy stroke in an eight-ball game. However, it is functional and does the job as intended.

Where to Strike the Cue Ball

A stop shot should be hit dead center on the cue ball in order to have the most influence over the game. Despite the fact that some players prefer to hit a bit below center in order to make the ball slide and stop it in its tracks after it makes contact with the object ball, this is not recommended. Take a look at this video to see an illustration of what I mean. When performing a stop shot, it is important to maintain the cue as level as possible. In addition, the follow-through should be around 4 – 6 inches after making contact with the object.

A Note About Aiming

When you first try these shots, you’ll need to concentrate your attention on the cue ball in order to ensure that the ball is struck in the proper place. During your initial two of warm-up strokes, concentrate on finding your target. Having determined where you wish to make contact with the cue ball, move your target up to the object ball and the chosen pocket. Concentrate on the object ball for your final two of warm-up strokes, and keep your aim fixed on it during contact and follow-through.

It does, however, require time and effort to master.

Become a Positioning Pro

The first time you try these shots, you’ll need to concentrate your attention on the cue ball in order to ensure that the ball is struck in the proper place. During your initial two of warm-up strokes, make an effort to determine your goal. Then raise your sights to the cue ball and the desired pocket after determining where you want to make contact with it. – During your final two of warm-up strokes, and during contact and follow-through, keep your aim on the object ball to maintain concentration.

Training your brain to accomplish this will take time.

Further Reading

When you first try these shots, you’ll need to concentrate your attention on the cue ball to ensure that the ball is struck in the proper place. During your initial two of warm-up strokes, focus on finding your target. Then raise your sights to the cue ball and the desired pocket after determining where you want to make contact with it. Concentrate on the object ball for your final two of warm-up strokes, and during contact and follow-through. In time, you’ll be able to swiftly identify the right point of contact on the cue ball, which will allow you to concentrate your attention on the object ball without risk of miscuing.

Cue Ball Direction for All Types of Shots

See the CB control instructional page first for a nice basic tutorial that includes demos of much of the material listed below. The accompanying picture and video serve as excellent visual summaries as well: Most people are aware of the correct solution for an astun shot: it should be taken in the tangent line direction, perpendicular to the OB direction. This is referred to as the 90° rule. On cut shots (1/4 to 3/4 ball struck) made with a rolling CB, the cue ball changes direction by approximately 30° as it moves down the table.

When it comes to precisely visualizing the CB direction, the Dr.

Thethin/full hitsectionbelow contains information on hits that are fuller than 3/4-ball or thinner than a 1/4-ball.

Seetweener shots for shots that are “in between” all of these distinct scenarios (also known as “tweener” shots).

See the section on speed impacts for further information on how speed and table conditions affect CB trajectories. More information may be found in Volumes I and II of theVideo Encyclopedia of Pool Shots, as well as:

  • From Vol-II of the Billiard University instructional video series, NV D.11 – Cue Ball Control Target Pool Drill
  • NV C.5 – Wagon wheel cue ball control drill, from VEPP II
  • NV B.73 – Leaving an angle and coming into the line of a shot, from VEPS II
  • NV B.75 – Natural-angle examples using the 30° rule, from VEPS III
  • NV B.43 – Cue ball position control stu
  • Therail cut shot cue ball control
  • Ralph Eckert’s instruction on natural-roll position-play reference lines (parts 1, 2, and 3)
  • Therail cut shot cue ball control
  • Therail cut shot

There are acceptable estimations for the CB deflection angles for roll shots that may be used. A fairfull hit with a ball hit fraction larger than 3/4 will result in the CB deflecting almost three times (more accurately, 2.5 times) the cut angle: One further approach for estimating carom direction for complete strikes is the ” back of the ball ” system, in which the expected CB carom direction is parallel to a line passing through the center of the object (OB) and a point on its back (along the aiming line) is used to calculate the carom direction.

Here’s an example of Andrew Cleary’s demonstration.

A reasonably thin hit with a ball-hit-fraction of less than 1/4 will cause the CB to deflect approximately 70% of the angle between the aiming line and the tangent line, as shown in the diagram: Please refer to ” Rolling Cue Ball Deflection Angle Approximations ” (Business Day, November 2011) for further information, images, and examples.

  • Detailed instructions may be found in ” Draw Shot Cue Ball Directions ” (BD, December, 2011).
  • Higher speed causes the real ultimate route of the CB to be moved along the tangent line to a lower speed.
  • I of the Video Encyclopedia of Pool Shots has video demonstrations of these sorts of shots, which may be accessed here.
  • The system is referred to as the Rolling Carom Angle (RCA) system: View the following article for additional information: “Rolling Carom Angle Systems” (BD, September, 2021).
  • The adjustment in the ratio from 2/7 (from TP A.4) to 1/4 is an estimate to make things easier to understand because it is easy to imagine a quarter as a fraction (half of half).
  • Instead of using a cue, any length may be utilized using the approach instead.
  • If you’re using a cue, shaft, or butt to measure the length, you can mark the location at the precise 0.281 point to be as accurate as possible with your measurements.

0.281 is located at 16.3 inches (approximately 2 inches above the 1/4 point) on a regular 58-inch cue when marked with a standard pen.

View the following article for additional information: “Rolling Carom Angle Systems” (BD, September, 2021).

See also:  Pool Table Anatomy: An Overview of Pool Table Parts and Layout

Yes.

Placing the joint along the CB-GB line and rotating it until the designated location points at the carom target is the best method for determining the CB position and desired carom direction.

Attempt to create a line of centers that is perpendicular to that line.

It is effective for all angles of hits between 1/4-ball and 3/4-ball.

More information on how to perform this may be found in the videos on the peace-sign resource page.

For examples of how to design ball-in-hand carom shots using the peace sign and other strategies, see: how to aim carom shots for more information.

The type of photo for which the peace sign or the 3x angle concepts are appropriate is the one described above.

The following procedure is effective for all viewing angles.

Position 1 of the cue stick has the stick parallel to the route of the object ball and the tip of the stick even with the path of the ghost ball.

These connections are depicted by the rectangle.

Move it so that the bumper, the cue ball, and the ghost ball are all in a straight line with each other.

A point on the cue stick 1/4th of the way from the tip is indicated (or an approximation is made by halving twice), and the line from that point through the ghost ball is drawn, it will give the line taken by the cue ball when it hits the object ball.

In that scenario, the 1/4th mark should be aligned with the cue ball and the ghost ball, as indicated in the illustration.

It takes some time to become proficient in this way.

It should be noted that the tip and buttocks can only be in one location for each posture.

There will almost never be a time when the cue stick is parallel to a cushion – this is merely true in this example shot to make the geometry more evident.

The cue ball is first displaced one diamond from the side pocket, but following the contact, it is deflected three more diamonds down the table and into the center pocket.

Furthermore, there is no special significance to the length of the cue stick in this geometry.

Alternatively, four hand spans might be used.

a quote from Bob Jewett (in an AZB post): A strategy that is quite similar to PJ’s technique may be applied for BIH.

For example, one that is about a foot away from the tangent line would be appropriate.

Return from the location by about three (or two and a half) times the distance traveled.

Message received by e-mail from Neil Murphy (Toronto, Canada): The target line of the shot serves as my aiming system, and I mentally draw a rectangle between the contact points of both cue ball and object ball to serve as a guide for my aiming system (see the diagram below).

One of your graphics in one of your technical papers had deflection angles, which I was able to extract and enter into a spreadsheet.

For all angles ranging from 0 to 85 degrees, the natural angle extends rearward and cuts the vertical line below the cue ball at a constant 30 percent angle below the ball.

When I downloaded one of your charts, I extracted the deflection angles and began experimenting with the geometry on my spreadsheets.

In this case, the height of the division is close to 30 percent of the overall vertical axis height!

As a result, we now have a technology that allows us to properly forecast the route of the cue ball.

However, for the vast majority of shots, you can acquire a decent approximation by looking down the target line.

Occasionally, I will picture the rectangle stretching to the right and then select the 30 percent position for both the draw and the follow operations.

Because it’s simple to remember, I refer to it as the Bottom-Center-Arrow approach, or B-C-A method for short.

From the shooter’s point of view, this circle depicts the cueball’s face on the cueball.

This will cross the tangent line at a 90-degree angle, which we shall refer to as point A.

Given the vertical tip offset on the cueball’s face, this results in the CB’s direction once roll has begun to take effect.

Dr. Dave has chosen to keep this website free of commercials and advertisements. If you like the free materials, please consider giving a one-time or recurring monthly gift to express your appreciation: https://www.gofundme.com/fundraising/donate/

Intro to Spin

Is it possible for you to recall a professional pool player on television or a good player at your local pool hall who never missed a shot and always seemed to have an easy shot at the pool table? Their ability to accomplish this is due to their understanding of how to handle the cue ball in order to add spin to it, which will force it to go in a different direction when it strikes the object ball. With the help of this spin, they are able to position the cue ball wherever they want it to go on the table for their next stroke, and today we will discuss the fundamentals of spin and what it does to the cue ball.

Stop shot

The stop shot is one of the most basic and yet one of the most successful shots in pool. The reason it is such a strong stroke is that it is reasonably easy to perform consistently, and it is extremely accurate since you know precisely where the cue ball will end up after you have fired the ball after you have shot the ball. In order to execute a stop shot, you must first stun the cue ball by striking it just below center, which will cause the cue ball to move over the table surface. If the cue ball is sliding and it collides with the object ball in its entirety, it will come to a complete halt in its original position.

Follow Shot

Following the object ball, you must play a follow shot if you wish the cue ball to go ahead after it has been struck. To successfully follow a cue ball, top spin as well as a good stroke are required. For greater follow, strike high on the cue ball, and you should see it roll forward after hitting the object ball, indicating that you have achieved your goal. Another thing to keep an eye out for is that on certain shots, even if you haven’t struck the cue ball very hard, it still appears to drift forward after making contact with the object ball.

Natural roll english is the term used to describe this sort of spin.

Draw Shot

Following the object ball, you must play a follow shot if you want the cue ball to go ahead after it has been hit. Top spin and a decent stroke are required in order to follow a cue ball. For additional follow, strike high on the cue ball, and you should see it roll forward after hitting the object ball, which indicates that you have achieved your goal. Another thing to keep an eye out for is that on certain shots, even if you haven’t struck the cue ball very hard, it still appears to travel forward after making contact with the object ball, which can be confusing.

As a result, even though there is no backspin or stun on the cue ball, the friction between the ball and the felt on the table forces the ball to move forward, resulting in the ball following. Natural roll English is the term used to describe this sort of spinner.

Importance of stroke

During a game of pool, it is impossible to overstate the significance of a smooth accelerating stroke. Making certain that your cue stick accelerates as it passes through the cue ball is what permits you to begin more or less spin according on the shot you are playing. Except for short distances, just hitting the cue ball low or high on the cue ball will not provide very good results. The ability to speed through the cue ball is necessary in order to properly conduct draw and follow strokes. This is what will cause the spin to occur on the shot.

How To Control The Cue Ball: The Basics Explained

If you’ve ever observed a professional pool player at the table, you’ll notice that their primary attention is constantly focused on the cue ball in front of them. As a result, the training cueball has become such a massive sensation because it has the power to make or break a game, and since it allows you to do almost anything on the table with it. How does one go about learning how to manage the cue ball in the proper manner? There are a plethora of various shots that the cue ball is capable of, and it’s a simple question of angles and power that may assist you in achieving them.

This article will lead you through the many various sorts of shots you can make with a cue ball, as well as how putting a different spin on the ball may help you achieve anything you want to achieve.

How Do You Control the Cue Ball?

The cue ball is controlled by a variety of targeting methods, which are utilized by players during the game of pool. As the ball that serves as a connecting point between the cue and the object ball you’re attempting to pocket, mastering the ability to control simply this one will be essential to your success while playing this game. When it comes to cue ball control, a number of elements come into play, including the speed with which you strike it and the angle at which it strikes the opposing ball.

The simplest way to comprehend how the cue ball works is to line up a shot and imagine that the cue ball is substituting whatever ball it is that you’re trying to hit with your hands.

The reality is that this is easier said than done, and there are a variety of tactics that you’ll need to learn in order to ensure that it is successful.

How to Curve the Cue Ball

We don’t always want the ball to move in a straight line across the table, and there may be moments when it will be necessary for it to curve around to reach its destination. While learning how to bend the cue ball such that it goes in the direction you like might take some time and effort, the skill is absolutely learnable. Setting up the cue ball such that it is aligned with your object ball and the pocket you want to hit is the first step in the process. Since your pace should only be sufficient for the object ball to arrive in the pocket, you must be aware of how to prevent the ball from reaching there after it has arrived.

  1. Depending on which way you want to bend it, you’ll need to work at an elevation of between 30-45 degrees.
  2. Concentrate on hitting the ball at 3 o’clock on the clock; it should bend just enough to reach the pocket.
  3. In order to create topspin, the cue must strike the ball approximately in the center, and the higher you reach this objective, the more spin you’ll obtain.
  4. For a topspin, align the cue ball and object ball and attempt to strike the ball just above the middle of the table.
  5. Remember that employing topspin will cause the ball to go further than if you utilized another sort of stroke, so it’s best to save it for situations where extra distance is needed to make your shot.

Pushing the cue ball towards the object ball in a straight path and following through is the key to achieving the ideal topspin.

How to Put a Backspin on the Cue Ball

A backspin, also known as a draw shot, is a type of stroke that should be employed when you want the cue ball to draw back after hitting the object ball after hitting the cue ball. In order to set yourself up for a successful pocket shot, you must make certain that the shot is struck at the proper angle in order for it to really drag the ball away from you. When it comes to performing a backspin or draw shot, positioning is critical. Your objective should be to strike at around onecue tip’s width right below center, and if you want even more draw, you may drop this marker by a slight bit or hit it with considerably more power.

See also:  Introducing HOBBES: The Board Game About Life

It’s simple to practice this shot by attempting to hit different spots for the draw on different occasions.

How to Put a Sidespin on the Cue Ball

After a ball has been struck, sidespin is a frequent method used to influence the angle that the object ball will take after it has been struck. According on the angle of attack, this sort of move is frequently described to as a ‘English’ move, although it might also be referred to as a right or left spin. If you want to accomplish sidespin, you must position the cue ball so that it may easily contact the object ball on either the left or right side of the table. The angle you require it to take will be determined by where you strike it; the further right you strike it, the greater the left angle will be.

Learning the angles, on the other hand, is more difficult than it appears, and there are errors when the ball does not go in the exact way you want it to.

Tips for Controlling the Balls in Pool

There are several professional techniques you can follow that will make ball control simpler, and if you can remember to put them into practice, you’ll have a lot easier time mastering the cue ball than you would otherwise. Keep these tips in mind the next time you’re playing pool and wanting to learn how to manage your cue ball better.

Practice with just the cue ball

Become proficient with the cue ball on its own before you can become a decent pool player in general. Invest as much time as is necessary in learning how to manage the cue ball when there are no other balls on the table to distract you. Once you’ve mastered this technique, it will be much easier to execute the numerous shots that are necessary.

Choose the right starting spot

When the game begins, it is all about determining the best position from which to break. If you’re playing at a public table, you’ll typically be able to tell where the most people are starting by looking at the scuff marks on the table. Based on the people who have gone before you, there’s a fair likelihood this is the road you should choose.

Get a good stance

Having your posture sorted out will make it much easier to manage the cue stick and the ball in the game.

Some players choose to put their left or right foot forward depending on how they feel most comfortable. Keep in mind that your positioning will need to be adjusted for different shots in order to get it correctly.

Are Training Cue Balls Necessary?

Training cue balls are a relatively new product in the world of pool, but some players may find them to be beneficial when learning how to manage the game properly. While you use a training cue ball, it is a standard-sized ball with patterns and markings engraved on its surface that indicate precise angles and sweet spots that you should be aiming for when making specific sorts of strokes. The objective of these balls is to aid in the teaching of spin effects and the learning of cue ball control, and they are often available in both advanced and beginning versions.

However, depending on your learning style and how much assistance you believe you want, it might be an excellent method of learning the fundamentals of cue ball control.

Why Your Pool Cues Matter

It is easy to overlook how crucial our pool cues are in helping us reach this goal when we are focused on learning how to manage the cue ball and other aspects of the game. Given that the cue stick is the only thing that stands between us and the ball, selecting one that has the appropriate attributes will actually make it much simpler to maintain control of the balls on the table. The tip is the most significant characteristic, and there are four primary varieties, each of which offers something different.

The softest tips are more suited for spinning, whilst the hardest tips are better suited for breaking.

The length and weight of the pool cue are also crucial considerations, and they should correspond to your physical requirements.

It is recommended that you start with a weight between 19.5 and 21 oz, and as your abilities improve and you gain more control, you should move to a lesser weight.

Related Questions

Pool is a game that requires numerous calculations and considerations to be performed correctly, and learning the game may take a significant amount of time and patience. When it comes to pool, controlling the cue ball is a vital skill that must be learned, and we’ve answered some often asked questions regarding how to do so well.

Should You Look at the Cue Ball or Object Ball?

When setting up and taking your shots in the pool, your attention should always be on the object ball in order to get the most precise position possible. Holding your sight fixed on the object ball after the shot has been executed will allow you to watch the trajectory that it takes.

How Do You Hold a Pool Cue For Control?

Place your left hand on the table to form a bridge, which will be where the cue will rest, and select the groove in your hand that will assist you in completing the shot successfully.

Holding the butt cap of the pool stick with the thumb, index finger, and middle finger can help you line up the shot.

What is the Best Cue Tip Size?

According on their ability level, the optimum size for each player will be determined. A 13mm cue tip will be sufficient for the majority of players with moderate ability. The bigger the tip, the more probable it is that you will strike the ball, but it takes some time and effort to get it right. You might also be interested in the following articles:

  • Pool Cue Tip Replacement Instructions
  • Graphite Pool Cues vs. Wood Pool Cues – Which Is Better? What’s the Difference Between the Two
  • What Are Low Deflection Pool Cues and How Do They Work? Is pool considered a sport? Everything You Need to Know

How To Put English On The Cue Ball?

Puttin’ English on the cue ball might be challenging when you are just starting out. As a result, you should hold off on learning English until you can consistently make strokes and strike the cue ball dead center. Put English on the cue ball is accomplished by striking the cue ball at various points with your stick. Inaccuracy can result in damage to your table as well as missing shots if you are not careful. Hitting the cue ball low on the cue ball is one technique of putting english on the cue ball.

Hit too low or allow your stick to slip off the ball when shooting low and the felt on the table will be torn off the table.

Make sure your stick is correctly chalked while you’re shooting, but especially when you’re putting English on the ball, because this will improve your accuracy.

What Does It Mean To Put English On The Cue Ball?

Making the cue ball spin involves applying spin to the ball in an effort to better control where the cue ball will end up in the pool table. Have you ever pondered why the best pull players seem to take the easiest shots? It is not because they are fortunate. Good pool players anticipate where the cue ball will land, either perfectly or within a few inches of its final destination before taking a shot. Three important criteria enable players to do this: English proficiency, speed control, and the Tangent Line.

  1. The top pool players are able to predict where the cue ball will land on the table 4,5, or even 7 strokes in advance.
  2. Billiards is a game that, when played properly, is entirely dependent on talent.
  3. If you want to line up every shot correctly, you must have complete control over the cue ball at all times.
  4. English refers to the many spins that may be applied to the cue ball to cause it to stop wherever on the table in the game of pool.

An explanation of how to place English on the cue ball for those who are new to the game. If you already grasp the fundamentals of English, keep an eye out for my future posts, which will be more in-depth.

Low English for Draw

Is it possible that you’ve witnessed someone take a straight shot and the ball, instead of trailing after them, quickly reverses direction? When you use low English on the ball, this is what occurs. A low english stroke, also known as back spin, is produced by striking the cue ball low on the table such that the cue ball has backspin when it strikes the object ball. When the cue ball reaches the object ball, it will roll backward if it is still spinning in the opposite direction as the object ball.

  • I’d want to emphasize that the backspin must make it to the object ball in order to be effective.
  • For example, if you’re shooting a long shot, you may have to use a lot of energy to get the ball to the target.
  • It simply implies that you will require more backspin on the ball.
  • More than just bringing the ball back in a straight line, there are several other methods to employ draw, which will be addressed in greater depth in following sections.
  • If the stroke isn’t a straight shot, you should glance at the tangent line to get a sense of where the cue ball is going to end up.

High English for Follow

High top english is essentially the polar opposite of draw in terms of strategy. When playing high top english, you aim to hit the ball high on the ball rather than low on the ball. When you hit the ball high in the air, the ball will have a forward spin, which is beneficial. When the cue ball connects with the object ball, the forward spin causes the cue ball to go forward. A straight in shot with high top english will follow the object ball into the pocket if you shoot it straight in with high top english.

Straight shots aren’t the finest shots for learning how to use English, but they are excellent representations of the fundamentals of the language.

Straight shots are bad for you, and I could write a full post on why, but I’ll keep that for another time.

Left English for Left Spin

After the cue ball strikes a rail, the consequences of applying left spin to the cue ball are minor. However, for those who are more experienced, there are methods to employ left english before it reaches a rail, such as with throws and masse’ shots, but because this article is about the fundamentals of english, we will only discuss the impacts after the ball strikes a rail. By striking the cue ball on the left side of the ball, you may create a left spin on the ball. Shooting from the left side of the ball may cause your aim to be off at first, and it will take a lot of practice to become proficient.

Consider the following example: if you line up a straight shot of the cue ball at the rail, it will go to the left after striking the rail.

(as seen in the illustration below) The distance to which the ball deviates from the rail to the left is determined by your speed and the amount of spin on the ball.

Right English for Right Spin

Right English is, in many ways, the polar opposite of left English. You use proper English by shooting the ball from the correct side of the court (pictured below). The ball will spin to the right as a result of this. When you fire a ball at the rail with proper English, it will deflect to the right instead of returning straight to the shooter. (as seen in the illustration below) The quantity of right spin controls how far the wheel will swing to the right. If you merely apply a small amount of right spin, it will get near to returning to its original position.

Another important component in ball control is the player’s speed.

See also:  7 Fun Billiards Games to Play With Your Friends

Controlling The Ball

These are the fundamentals of the English language. Straight shots were chosen in the examples for high and low english since they are the easiest to describe, but you may utilize high and low english on any shot. The cue ball will react differently depending on how the shot is executed. Keep an eye out for future posts in which I will break down each style of English and explain it in further depth. The fundamentals of English are extremely straightforward:

  • When it strikes a rail, right english spins to the right, while left english spins to the left when it hits a rail.

You can make the cue ball do some pretty weird things if you mix left or right english with top or bottom english as your skill level increases. Although the fundamental notion of english is straightforward, when applied to various strokes, the possibilities for how the cue ball might go around the table are virtually limitless. However, managing the cue ball is not just dependent on your command of the English language; your quickness is also a significant role in controlling the ball when playing pool.

Furthermore, you may know every word of English in the world, but if you shot too hard, the ball will still not land where you want it to.

Sitemap – Pages – Ozone Billiards

  • Home
  • 8 For 8 Ball
  • Cue Extensions Explained in Detail
  • Variations in the APA Pool Rules
  • Instructions for Simple Pool Table Maintenance
  • Time Out Guidelines for League Coaches Tips for League Players on When to Take a Time Out
  • The differences between pool drop pockets and a ball return
  • The sizes of the balls
  • And more. Find your joint size by comparing different sized pool sticks and different types of wraps. Determine the height of your pool table light
  • Guide to Purchasing a Pool Table
  • Life Expectancy of a Pool Table Cushion, as well as a test
  • Sneaky Pete is defined as follows: Weight of the cue ball is standard
  • Differences in the tables
  • Why Choosing the Correct Pool Cue Tip Is Important
  • An explanation of what a Regulation Pool Sized Table is. What is a Taper and how does it work? What Is the Purpose of Chalk on Pool Cues? A comparison between woolen cloth with combed wool The following articles are written by Bob Henning: Instructional Articles Bob Henning’s Killer Instinct was published in November 2006, and an interview with Thorsten Hohmann was conducted in March 2006. One-on-one time with Dave Pearson, the Wizard of OZ. In this section, you will find information on Ozone Recreation in Kennesaw, Georgia and Norcross, Georgia. You will also find information about STROKE 101 by Bob Henning, published in March 2007, and Ozone Recreation – Atlanta Game Room, PatioHome Theater.
  • Detailed Product Information
  • Gift Cards and Wish Lists
  • Manage Your Account
  • Security and Privacy
  • Site Features
  • Ordering and Tracking
  • Issues with Your Order
  • A Quick Look at 8 Ball Game Variations
  • Staying Away from the Scratch
  • Case Considerations are invoked. Learn How to Miss Shots Like a Pro in the Defensive Pool
  • Create a Pre-Shot Routine with these instructions. How to Play PoolHave a good time
  • How to Play Pool More Effectively Using Better Technology
  • Is it dirty to play defense in a pool game? Joining a pool league
  • Increasing the effectiveness of pool practice
  • Sizes of pool tables, and which one is best for you
  • Should I Purchase a Pre-owned Pool Table? Is it necessary to get my shaft turned down? The Most Appropriate Pool Cue for You
  • Understanding the speed and control of the cue ball
  • Understanding the Lag Shot
  • Understanding the Lag Shot What is sandbagging in a swimming pool? What is the most effective pool ball set? When Should You Use Jump Shots? Do’s and Don’ts at a Pool Hall
  • How to Rack a Set of Pool Balls In this second installment of “How to Rack Pool Balls,”
  • What Do You Do When You Get a Bank Shot? In May 2008, Rail Shots was released, in September 2008, Rail-First Safety was released, in July 2008, Tempo for Consistency was released, and in August 2008, Tempo for Consistency was released. The Diamond’s nineteenth anniversary is June 2006
  • The Reference Is Extending Until July 2006
  • Establishing Proper Billiards Alignment
  • Refining the Stop Shot
  • Refining Stop Shot Mastery
  • Establishing Proper Billiards Alignment – December 2005
  • In the month of January 2006, we looked at the cue ball and shot making. Getting a Good Grip on Your Pool Cue – February 2006
  • It is important to have a good grip. Common mistakes include: in-and-out gripping, too tight gripping, and position.

Improve Your Drawing Skills – September 2006 How to Make a Proper Pool Cue Stroke – March 2006.

  • In this section, you will learn about the Back Stroke, the Proper Stroke of a Pool Cue – Neutral Position, the Proper Stroke of a Pool Cue – the End of Stroke, and more.

April 2006 marked the beginning of position mastery. The Winner Will Be Announced in August 2006 Follow-up: October 2006 Precise Drawing; November 2006 Follow-up Different Strokes was released in December 2006. An Uncomplicated Draw Shot – January 2007. In February 2007, the Draw Control program was launched. In March of 2007, I began learning English. In April of 2007, I was pocketing balls with English. Position in English – May 2007 Combining Draw and Follow in English – June 2007 Position in English – July 2007 Inside English – July 2007 (Inside English) Rail Shot with Inside English – August 2007 Combos with English – September 2007 Rail Shot with Inside English In the month of October 2007, two difficult shots were taken with the inside.

Running Balls for the Month of December 2007 In February 2008, rail shots were taken for position.

The month of November 2008 was Jump or Kick. Exercises for Stroke Prevention – December 2008 This is the perfect practice shot for January 2009! In February of 2009, One-Rail Kicks released their first single. Two Kicking System Spots on the Wall, as well as two Kicking System Rail Shots with Draw

  • If I Could Only Teach You One Shot – PAGE 2 – CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE
  • If I Could Only Teach You One Shot – PAGE 3 – CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 1 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 2 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 3 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 4 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The Battle of the Banging Balls and Drills – November 2008
  • How to Put Three English Tips into Practice Without Using a Volleyball – The month of December 2008 In January 2009, there will be no more fancy pants shooting. Jumping – The Short Jump Shot
  • Running – The Run Out Drill Practice Drills That Develop Consistency – Part 1
  • Practice Drills That Develop Consistency: Part II
  • Practice Drills That Develop Consistency – Part 3
  • Seeing the Drill Relieves Nervous Competitive Pressure
  • Seeing the Drill Relieves Nervous Competitive Pressure Kicking Out Part 1
  • Kicking Out Part 2
  • Practice Drills That Develop Consistency – Part 4
  • Practice Drills That Develop Breaking Skills Part 1
  • Practice Drills That Develop Breaking Skills, Part 2
  • Practice Drills Kicking Out Part 1
  • Kicking Out Part 2 – May 2010
  • Practice Drills Kicking Out Part 2 – May How to Improve Your 1-Ball Game in 30 Days or Less – Guaranteed Safety-Play Shots, Part 1
  • Safety-Play Drill, Part 2
  • Safety-Play Drill, Part 3
  • Developing Your Straight In Stop Shot Drill
  • Developing Your Follow Shot Drill
  • One Rail Kick Shot, Part 1 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 2 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 3 by “The Drill Instructor”
  • The One Rail Kick Shot, Part 4 by “The Drill Instructor” Drills vs Banging Balls – November 2008
  • How to Use Three English Tips Without Using a Volleyball is explained in detail here. In the month of December 2008 From January 2009, there will be no more fancy pants shooting. Jumping – The Short Jump Shot
  • Running – The Run Out Drill
  • The Practice Drills That Develop Consistency – Part 1
  • The Practice Drills That Develop Consistency: Part II
  • The Practice Drills That Develop Consistency – Part 3
  • Seeing the Drill Relieves Nervous Competitive Pressure
  • Drills for Breaking Skills Part 1
  • Drills for Breaking Skills, Part 2
  • Practice Drills for Kicking Out Part 1
  • Practice Drills for Kicking Out Part 2 – May 2010
  • Practice Drill What you need to know about getting 1-ball better in just 30 days, guaranteed. Safety-Play Shots Part 1
  • Safety-Play Drill Part 2
  • Safety-Play Drill Part 3
  • Developing Your Straight In Stop Shot Drill
  • Developing Your Follow Shot Drill

Carom Variations: How to Make the 8-Ball on the Break Carom Techniques In September 2009, the ball position center was used in an effective double kiss. Avoiding Scratches – November 2009 Keeping Peace with Baby – October 2009 The 30-Degree Rule for Caroms was implemented in December 2009. Keeping Your Cool – January 2010 Keeping Your Head in the Game – February 2010 Clarifying the Tangent Line – April 2010 Clarifying the Vison – March 2010 In the month of May 2010, the shape was two rails. June 2010: An Elegant Kiss; July 2010: Maximum Stun Follow; August 2010: August 2010 is the month when you should spring forward to move back.

  • Carom Variations on How to Make the 8-Ball on the Break A Double Kiss with a Ball Position Center in September 2009 was useful. Preventing Scratches – November 2009 Peaceful Baby – October 2009 Preventing Scratches Caroms are played according to the 30-degree rule, which was implemented in December 2009. January 2010: Keeping Your Head in the Game February 2010: Kicking It Safe Clarifying the Tangent Line – April 2010 – March 2010 – Clarifying the Vision In the month of May 2010, the shape was two-rail. June 2010: An Elegant Kiss
  • July 2010: Maximum Stun Following
  • August 2010 – Spring Forward to Reverse Time In September 2010, the Outside English Habit was introduced. Compositions and Positions in October 2010 with a Slight Throw
  • WPA World Artistic Pool Championships – 2015
  • Jeanette Lee “The Black Widow” on Sept. 15, 2014
  • Georgia Junior State 9-Ball Championships
  • Ozone Billiards New Store Celebration
  • WPA World Artistic Pool Championships – 2015
  • A $10,000 donation to Breast Cancer Research and Awareness was raised by Ozone Billiards
  • A Boys and Girls Club Day for Kids was held on September 6, 2014
  • A Boys and Girls Club Billiard Education Seminar was held at Ozone Billiards
  • And an American Cancer Society event was held at Ozone Billiards.

The History of Ozone Billiards Tours sponsored by Ozone Billiards are held throughout the year.

  • The Tri-State Tour will take place on November 8, 2014
  • The Predator Pro-AM Tour Stop24 will take place on November 9, 2014
  • The J. Pechauer Northeast Women’s Tour will take place on November 6, 2014
  • The New England 9 Ball Tour will take place on November 5, 2014
  • The Predator Pro-AM Tour will take place on October 11-12, 2014
  • The Lone Star Billiards Tour -Season Finale will take place on October 4-5, 2014
  • And the New England The Predator Pro-AM Tour will take place on October 5, 2014
  • The Tri-State Tour will take place on September 20-21, 2014
  • The J.Pechauer Northwest Women’s Tour will take place on September 6-7, 2014
  • The Tiger Southern Mid-Atlantic Tour will take place on September 13-14, 2014
  • The Lone Star Billiards Tour will take place on September 13-14, 2016.
  • Introducing Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots III: Episode 1
  • Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots – High Jump Trick Shot Tutorial
  • Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots – Passing Lane Trick Shot Tutorial
  • Just Showing Off – Classic Trick Shot
  • Butterfly Shot
  • Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots – Desert Pool Trick Shots
  • Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots – Railroad Shot Tutorial
  • Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots – A tutorial for the Stroke Shot Trick Shot by Florian Kohler of Venom Trick Shots
  • A tutorial for the Under/Over Trick Shot by Florian Kohler of Venom Trick Shots
  • And another tutorial for the Coffin Shot Trick Shot by Florian Kohler of Venom Trick Shots. To learn how to do the Rocket Masse Trick Shot, watch the video below. To learn how to do the Big “O” Trick Shot, watch the video below. Florian Kohler – Venom Trick Shots – The Big “O” Trick Shot Tutorial, watch the video below.

Arrangements for Shipping and Delivery Get in Touch With Us Blog RSS Syndication is a method of distributing content on a blog.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *