Pool and Billiard Terms You Need to Know

Pool and Billiard Terms You Need to Know

Anyone who is just starting out on their adventure to learn how to play pool or billiards will find the learning curve to be quite steep. There are so many different pool and billiard terminologies that it might be difficult to keep track of them all. It might be difficult to learn the proper posture, cue techniques, angles, and tactics at first since they are all so complex. Fortunately, the internet has made it much easier to obtain excellent coaching, which formerly would have required months or years of hanging out at the local pool hall to uncover.

Basics Pool and Billiard Terms

  • 8-Ball. Two-player pool game in which players compete to get all of their balls into the pockets before striking the 8-ball into a pocket to win. More information on 8-ball may be found here. 9-Ball. A popular two-player pool game in which players must hit all of the balls into the pockets in the correct sequence. The person who hits the last ball, the 9-ball, in the game wins the game. More information about 9-ball may be found here
  • Bridge. Your bridge is the way you position your supporting hand to hold the pool cue in place while playing the game. In general, there are two types of bridges: open bridges and closed bridges. The term “bridge” refers to a device that aids in the support of the cue stick during difficult shots. It is referred to as a mechanical bridge or Chalk in certain circles. Pool chalk is used to assist prevent the tip of a cue from slipping when it hits the cue ball
  • It is also used to clean the table surface. This occurs when a player sinks one ball after another until the last ball is pocketed, so winning the game and the match. This is referred to as “running the table” or “cue stick” in some circles. Players strike a cue ball with a stick, which is referred to as a cue ball. This is the ball that is struck with a cue by a player. In the game of pool, the cue ball is always solid white, but in carom billiards, one player may choose to use a spotted or even a yellow cue ball
  • The object ball. It is the ball that a player tries to hit with the cue ball. An object ball is also referred to as a target ball in some circles
  • An open table. The balls that will be used as targets have not yet been decided. Object balls are allowed to be sunk by any player on the table
  • Rack. It is this frame that is utilized to assist in positioning the object balls before the beginning of the game. There are many other shapes available, including diamonds, but the most common is the triangle. If you want to use the phrase as a verb, you might say “It’s your turn to rack.” Here’s where you can learn how to rack correctly. Scratch. When a cue ball enters a pocket, it is referred to as a scratch. In certain pool games, the player who scratched is required to return one previously pocketed object ball to the foot area, while the other player retains possession of the ball in his or her hand. That implies he can choose any spot on the table to place the cue for his next turn. Solids. Object balls that are a solid color on the outside. The solids are numbered from one to eight. These are referred to as “lowsin 8-ball” in some circles. Stripes. In this case, the object balls are white, but they have varied colored bands around their middles. Stripes are labeled with numbers from 9 to 15. Some 8-ball players refer to stripes as “highs” when playing the game. To put a ball in one’s pocket. It is necessary to strike the cue ball in such a way that an object ball enters a pocket.

Anatomy of a Pool Table

  • Cushions. Cushions surround the table’s interior edges, which are decorated with diamonds. Between each pocket on the rails, there are three diamonds or markers that are evenly spaced. Players can utilize them to line up a shot
  • They are known as the Kitchen. This refers to the region between the head string and the head rail of the instrument. The player who breaks has the option of placing the cue ball anywhere in the kitchen
  • Long rails are available. The table’s two broader sides are defined by the lengthy rails that run the length of the table. Side rails and pockets are two terms that players may use to refer to them. Pockets are the six holes on a billiard table that pool players use to sink, or “pocket,” ball after ball. Tables for carom billiards do not have pockets on them. Corner pockets are the pockets that are located in each of the four corners of a pool table. Side pockets are the pockets that are located in the center of the long rails
  • Short rails are the pockets that are located at the ends of the long rails. The two narrower edges of the table are defined by the short rails. It is on the short rail that you place your balls when you first begin playing the game. It is referred to as the foot rail in some circles. It is common to refer to the opposite end of the table as thehead rail
  • Spots. On a pool table, there are two clearly indicated locations. The head spotlies are located at the center of the head string. a foot spotlie in the center of the foot string and indicates where to rack the balls or where to return an object ball that has already been sunk to the table
  • Strings Strings are two imaginary lines drawn on the table that run perpendicular to the head and foot places, and they are together referred to as thehead string and thefoot string.

Different Types of Shots

  • Shot from the bank. Any shot in which an object ball is sunk with the aid of a cushion Take a break shot. In this initial shot of the game, one player utilizes the cue ball to break apart the racked object balls, which is a first for the game. The game-changing shot. Making a shot with the purpose of breaking apart a tightly packed collection of balls and redistributing them into more advantageous places
  • It’s time to call a shot. Before taking the shot, the player depicts what will take place in his or her mind. Some games require players to call all of their shots, while others simply need them to call the last winning shot in order to win the game.
  • Take a shot at it. If the cue ball must strike the object ball at an angle in order for it to travel in a pocket, the shot is said to be an angle shot. This is referred to as an angle shot or a defensive shot by others. Making a shot with the sole goal of depriving your opponent of any quality shots for his following turn
  • This is known as the English shot. English application to the cue ball refers to striking the cue ball anyplace other than directly in the middle of the table. Skilled players are able to control the motion of the cue both prior to and after striking an object ball by using appropriate English. Jump shot, as the saying goes. trick shot A cue ball is struck in such a way that the ball is propelled off the surface of the table
  • It is a trick shot Is establishing a ball position that appears to be virtually impossible, and then pocketing the object ball with ease. The majority of trick shots are set up outside of regular action, however players will occasionally attempt trick shots during regular gaming.

Now that you’re familiar with the terminology, it’s time to get out there and put it into practice.

About Bar Games 101

Bar Games 101 is a website dedicated to assisting you in learning about the finest games to play with your friends in a social setting. We go through the games in detail, analyze the regulations, and unearth helpful hints and methods to help you win. Get our free guide to the 50 Best Bar Games by filling out the form below.

Beginner Billiards Terms: Basic Pool Terminology

A game of billiards, sometimes known as pool, is a skill-based game that may be found in pubs, gaming rooms, and pool halls all over the world. Professional billiards players put through countless hours of practice to achieve their level of proficiency, but even a novice pool player may enjoy this traditional game. The act of putting a ball into the pocket is a pleasant feeling, especially when you’re doing it with your friends and family by your side. If you’re considering about trying your hand at pool, you should be familiar with the lingo.

Imperial has put up this guide to assist you in understanding the most important billiards words and phrases so that you can jump straight into the action as soon as possible.

Basic Pool and Billiard Terminology

In order to assist you better grasp the game, below are some often used pool terms: 8-Ball: This is the most often played variation of pool. It is played by two people, and the object of the game is for each player to get all of their balls into the holes before sinking the 8-ball to win. In this variant, one player is represented by stripes, while the other is represented by solids. Players aim to knock the balls in numerical order rather than splitting them into solids or stripes in this variant of pool.

  1. During the course of the game, you will utilize a long woodenstick, which you will use to strike the cue ball and to sink colored balls into the holes.
  2. Use them to apply chalk to the tip of your cue stick, which is what you want to do.
  3. In order for the cue ball to roll into the colored and numbered balls on the pool table, you must strike the cue ball with your cue stick.
  4. The cue ball is significantly bigger and heavier than the other balls on the table, and it is used to strike the ball.
  5. They are numbered, with the highest number being 15 for a regular game of 8-ball.
  6. They are available in a variety of sizes and shapes.
  7. When playing 8-ball, players may refer to solids as “lows,” which is slang for “lows.” Stripes: These item balls are numbered nine through fifteen and have a band of color across the centre of them.
  8. In order to take your shot, you must first line up on the bridge and then take your shot.
  9. Rack: The triangle-shaped apparatus that is used to align the object balls at the beginning of a game is referred to as the rack.
  10. When this occurs, the player who scratched is required to place one of the balls they had previously pocketed back onto the table.
  11. The term “pocket a ball” refers to when the cue ball makes contact with an object ball, and the object ball falls into a pocket as a result of the stroke.

You’ve moved one step closer to achieving victory in the game. Taking a shot after pocketing a ball extends your turn, allowing you to take further shots – unless you scratched during your turn.

Parts of a Pool or Billiards Table

In order to assist you better grasp the game, below are some often used pool terminology: Pool (eight-ball): This is the most often played variation of the game of pool in America. In this game, there are two players who compete to get all of their balls into the holes before the other person sinks the 8-ball, which is the winning ball. Stripes and solids are the colors of one player in this variation. 9-Ball: In this variation of pool, players strive to strike the balls in numerical sequence rather than splitting them into solids or stripes.

  1. Toss the cue ball and sink colored balls into the holes, you will use a long woodenstick, which you will be using throughout the game.
  2. Use these to apply chalk to the tip of your cue stick, which you can see in the picture.
  3. You strike the cue ball with your cue stick in order to send it rolling into the colored and numbered balls on the pool table.
  4. When compared to the other balls on the table, the cue ball is somewhat bigger and heavier.
  5. It is possible to have a totally colored object ball, or a ball with a colored stripe around the center.
  6. Solids are sometimes referred to as “lows” in the game of 8-ball.
  7. In 8-ball, these are referred to as “highs.” In order to take your shot, you must first line up your cue stick on a bridge.
  8. At the beginning of a game, the object balls are aligned using a rack, which is a triangle-shaped apparatus.
  9. When the cue ball enters a pocket, it is referred to as a scratch.
  10. In order to proceed with their next stroke, their opponent must first collect the cue ball off the table and set it on the table.
  11. Congratulations, you’ve taken another step toward victory in the game.
See also:  The Quest for the Best Cornhole Board

A-Z Pool: Terms You May Not Know

“Can you tell me what that means?” “How come I’d never heard of it before?” You’ve probably stated these phrases aloud while you’re playing pool and someone tosses out a term that you’re not acquainted with! Okay, so you’ve never heard of this word before throughout the course of your pool-playing career. There’s nothing to worry about! At Delta-13, we’re constantly on the lookout for your.rack! (Not to mention your back.) We’ve developed an A-Z list of some of the less frequent words that you may hear individuals use more than once throughout a game to assist you in navigating the game.

  • “Al Bundy” is a term used to describe a player who has a tendency to miss simple shots or shots that are in the middle of the court.
  • “Break pad to break fabric,” says the narrator.
  • “Stay focused on your task.” When the cue ball is too close to your target object ball it causes your shot to become more complicated.
  • a drag shot in which the cue ball develops roll before collision with the object ball, resulting in a follow shot is called a “drag follow.” The phrase “Eight and Out” refers to a run of eight balls into your pocket, which results in a one-pocket triumph!
  • When a ball is undercut, the term “fat” describes the way it strikes.
  • Unforced error: A miss or a mistake that occurs after your opponent leaves you with a difficult shot or *safety shot*.
  • “Goalie” A player who never scores himself, but instead plays defensively to prevent others from scoring.

When a ball rolls along the rail cushion, it is said to “hug the rail.” I “Inside cut” bank shot occurs when the cue ball strikes the object ball on the side of the object ball that is facing the bank direction, causing natural cut-induced spin to be imparted to the object ball.

“Jellyroll” is an abbreviation for J “Jellyroll.” A fantastic roll of the cue ball that puts you in the ideal position for your next shot to fall in.

K A “kill shot” is a shot in which you utilize draw to limit the mobility of the cue ball after it makes contact with an object ball or a rail.

L “Lag shot” is a skillshot in which each player must shoot a ball from behind the head string and return it as near to the head rail as possible after it has bounced off the foot rail.

‘Money ball’ refers to a ball that, when lawfully pocketed, brings about a triumph.

Someone who is a “nit” is someone who demands an excessive handicap or who complains about the fairness of a wager.

“Out shot” refers to a tough shot that, if successful, should result in a win.

“Pattern play” refers to the practice of strategically placing the balls in a specific order based on their position and grouping.

“Quick sketch” is an abbreviation for “quick draw.” An action in which the CB draws back from the tangent line as quickly as feasible is known as a cut shot draw action.

R “Railbird” is a term used to describe someone who observes or gambles on a sporting event without participating.

After rebounding off a rail, side spin causes the cue ball to accelerate, resulting in a wider (longer) rebound angle and a faster rebound speed.

S Safety break: A defensive break in which you attempt to prevent your opponent from getting a shot off.

The phrase “Stop on a dime” refers to a player who makes a flawless stop shot (the cue ball stops dead in place).T “Throw shot” refers to a shot in which the object ball’s course is altered by using sidespin.

U “Undercut” is an abbreviation.

“Up and down” is a common expression.

When you aim at the vertical line running through the center of the cue ball, you are aiming at the vertical centerline.

Drill for position control in which you attempt to send the cue ball in a variety of directions from the same stroke.

Technique errors as a result of anxious strain are referred to as “Yips.” Z “Zone” is an abbreviation for Zone.

Do you have any other terminology that you’ve overheard at the table that you’d want to add to our list?

We may even include yours on this list on our blog page if we think it’s appropriate.

Delta-13, based in Parker, Colorado, is the world’s top aluminum billiard accessories manufacturer, creating and manufacturing its products.

Players have greater enjoyment at the table as a result of the explosions of the balls.

The Delta-13 Elite is the official racket of the Women’s Professional Basketball Association (WPBA), some Men’s ESPN events, professional tours, and other amateur leagues.

This strong break is made possible by the aeronautical precision design that is favoured by pros. This personalized metal ball rack is the only one available that can be customized with engraving and specific colors.

Billiard Terminology You May Not Be Familiar With: Pool Shots

Whether you’ve been playing pool for a long time or are just getting started, you may notice that a significant number of the terminology used in the game are unfamiliar or even offensive. Many of these phrases have a lengthy and illustrious history to back them up. The meanings and definitions of their names have evolved over time as a result of the efforts of many pool players who have refined them. A large part of this is attributable to the evolution of billiards in recent years, which has occurred from the late nineteenth century to the present day.

Delta-13 would like to break down some of the trick shot terminology for you, our wonderful readers and gamers!

Alternatively, you may have witnessed someone else do one during a game and been intrigued.

That is no longer the case!

“Behind the Back”

Shot taken with the cue stick held behind your back while sitting on the table’s rail and trying to make a tough or unattainable shot with the cue stick. Most of the time, this type of shot demands a light stroke and should be performed with caution. Some bars have restrictions that prohibit you from sitting at the table for this shot, so be sure to check with your local bar before doing so during play. Despite the fact that this picture was first noted as a popular shot in 1978, it appears that records of its origin extend back to the early 18th century.

The photo above most likely depicts a pleasant game of pool at a pool hall.

Usually, a different approach, such as shooting with the opposite hand, can be just as successful.

“Machine Gun”

When the cue ball is fired, it bounces off the other balls and hits them all at once, making a machine gun-like sound when it hits them all at once. Yank Adams, who originally played this shot in 1916, is credited with doing it by rolling the cue ball with his hand, according to history. In 1965, Willie Mosconi was again said to have used similar shot, although this time with a pool cue. It’s important to make sure the balls are “one ball” from the rail while you’re setting up this shot. In today’s world, numerous trick shot artists make use of this shot.

“Pendulum Cannon”

It is possible to construct a “cannon” from of two balls that are three inches apart and in line parallel to the cushion, but just a little distance off the rail. It is possible to generate a pendulum effect when the cue ball touches the balls on alternating shots by striking them with the cue ball on alternate shots. Walter Lovejoy devised this shot in 1907, and it is still in use today. The phrase “Cannon” (also known as carom) refers to the act of a ball or rail bouncing off another ball or rail.

The Pendulum Stroke is also where the name for the pendulum derives from (or Swing).

When shooting, this stroke is distinguished by the fact that your elbow does not descend, resulting in a pendulum-like motion of your forearm. Broadfoot, a pool player from the year 1896, was the first person to notice this move.

“Postman’s Knock”

This is a kiss stroke in which the cue ball is directed at the object ball, close to the cushion; when the shot is made, the cue ball impacts the object ball twice in fast succession, making a knocking noise similar to that of a door (Knock, Knock). Mannock, a pool player from the year 1908, is credited with inventing and perfecting this stroke. By using this stroke, the object ball may be kept close to the cushion, resulting in the ball remaining still after its second impact with the cue ball.

“Railroad Shot”

A trickshot in which the cue ball slides along a groove in between two cue sticks that are arranged adjacent to each other on the table is performed. The “Train Station” is made by a single cue stick that forms an acute angle to the other two, while the “Track” is produced by two cue sticks that are placed adjacent to each other. According to historical records, this shot was executed by a pool player named Margo in 1981. This shot is performed by a large number of trickshot performers nowadays.

“Plant Shot”

A shot in which two object balls come into contact with each other on a line perpendicular to the cushion. In order for one cue ball to go into the pocket and the other to go off parallel to the table rail, the cue ball must be shot in two different directions. A “Kiss Shot” or a “Run Off” is another name for this type of combo shot. The centers of the two contacting balls were connected by an imaginary line drawn through them, and another line was drawn from the center of one of the balls (to be shot into the pocket).

  1. Hustler who has run out of money but continues to gamble is known as a “Air Gun.” When one player fails to score in a game, it is known as a “love game” (aka Shutout).
  2. If the stronger pool player loses, the weaker pool player will get a larger sum of money from the stronger pool player.
  3. Orange Crush: The weaker player is given the 5 orange ball and the break, which is also known as the crush, by the stronger player.
  4. Pay Ball is a game in which a participant earns money for each ball that is pocketed during play.
  5. Sandbagging is the practice of playing below your handicap in order to make the game easier.
  6. Selling out refers to a player who misses a shot and leaves their opponent with a favorable scoring outcome.Sharper is another term for a player who hustles.

a person who hides their ability to play well in order to make money. An inferior player who can only be beaten by the best players in the world. Shortstop:

Pool Jargon List

This is a compilation of numerous terms and phrases that are often used in the pool industry, particularly in Florida, where the list was initially assembled by Paul Moyland in 2003. Any revisions, additions, comments, or suggestions should be submitted to [email protected] at this time. Thank you. Also see the website. Billiards Terms and Phrases ******************************************************************************* action: As in, “At the Pool Room, there’s always something going on.” Gambling is referred to as action in some circles.

  1. The diamond in the middle of the table at the head of the table is treated as zero, and each diamond after that is considered to be a game in its own right.
  2. A poor hit is defined as failing to make a lawful shot.
  3. ball in hand In the sense of “I have ten barrels at a price of $20 a game.” A barrel represents the amount of money a player is wagering per game.
  4. can’t pay up since he was firing air barrels the entire time,” for example.
  5. shot on the eight must be clean: “Shots on the eight must be shot clean.” The eight must be shot in such a way that it does not make touch with any other balls before entering the pocket.
  6. (to) For future reference, keep meticulous track of the talents and betting tendencies of other players using the clock.
  7. dog the nine-to-fivers (also known as “dog the nine-to-fivers” or “dog the nine-to-fivers”) is a slang term for “dog the nine-to-fivers” (also known as “dog the nine” or “dog the nine”).
See also:  Shuffleboard Rules | How to Play Shuffleboard: A Complete Guide

Joe dogged it” can refer to any missed shot, as in “Joe dogged it.” even up: As in, “Let’s even everything out.” To pay the winner any money that is owing to him or her before proceeding.

Joe is a powerful front runner, as in “Joe is a strong front runner.” This term refers to a player’s ability to win a race even if he is already ahead by a few games at the time of the race.

get your act together: To perform at one’s greatest level on a given day.

Joe could go off at any time, as in “He could go off at any time.” To begin by betting tiny amounts of money and, after losing, to raise the stakes and continue to lose until one is out of money.

a hook(ed) phrase: For example, “Joe is referred to as Captain Hook.” Whenever one of the players shoots and misses, but by chance or purpose leaves his opponent with no shot, the game is declared a tie.

The term “horse” refers to a player who is playing for the benefit of another’s bet, either by mutual agreement or as the consequence of a calcutta.

Learn as much as you can about them before you begin to play.

When two players break even and the only money available to change hands is the money used to pay for table time, the house wins.

Cheating is sometimes referred to in general.

“When shooting over another ball, you must jackup your cue,” as in “When shooting over another ball, you must jackup your cue.” When shooting with a cue, it is customary to elevate the butt of the cue higher than one would typically do.

An example of a kick shot is when the cue ball is fired through one or more rails before it touches the object ball.

In contrast to “the wild eight,” if the eight is sunk early, it is not considered unique, and the seven is promoted.

In addition, to continue with the lemon.

(a) lock: As in “Joe has a lock on this game.” (b) lock: This indicates that he has absolutely no chance of losing the election.

The money ball is the ball that, if pocketed, results in the game’s victory.

In addition, “to deposit the funds.” nit: A player or a side-bettor who is unwilling to place a wager that is considered high enough in the eyes of the accuser.

“He’s such a nit that he wouldn’t even wager that the water is wet,” says the nit.

Known as “the Brazilian nuts,” “the Brazilians,” or “the stonecold nuts,” these nuts are sometimes referred to as “the Brazilian nuts.” Basically, it signifies that something is certain.

On the incline: It is said that a player is ‘on the hill’ when he has to win just one more game in order to win the set.

If you win the set, you will have accomplished your goal of getting “over the hill.” on the side: As in, “I’ll put $50 on the table on the side.” A wager placed on one of the participants in a sporting event by an observer.

race to: As in, “A race to seven games,” or simply “A race to seven,” or simply “A race to seven.” The winner is the first player to win seven games in a row.

Typically used in reference to shooting a ball targeting a specific pocket and having it land in a different pocket.

In nine-ball, this is a common expression.

The participants fire in a predetermined order, with the winner receiving a break.

Always in it for the money.

A ‘road warrior’ is someone who travels a lot.

The term “riding the nine” refers to the act of breaking and shooting in all of the balls without allowing your opponent a chance to fire back.

(to) sell out is to leave a good shot for the next player to take advantage of.

Typically, a session comes to an end when one or both players are out of money or when both players agree that they need to sleep.

They are playing a set for $300, as in “They are playing a set for $300.” It is possible to win money by participating in a specified number of games or races for a specific amount of money, which is known as a set.

To shark someone is to divert their attention away from what they are doing while they are shooting.

Six-ahead: The set is won by the player who wins six games more than the other player.

Playing’six ahead’ for $30 is the same as playing for $5 a game and “locking in” at least a six-game swing before you pay your money.

The term “top speed” refers to the highest level of performance a person may achieve.

In nine ball, the weaker player may need to win fewer games in order to win aset, or he may win if he pockets the eight ball, or the seven ball, or the six ball, or any other number of balls.

Likewise, see: weight.

See “horse”stall for further information: As in, “Joe, get off the stall, I know you’re a better player than this,” or anything like.

Keeping your actual ability hidden.

sweating the details of the action: To put it another way, “Everyone in the room was sweating the action.” This term refers to persons other than the participants who place bets on the game.

ten-game To play for $50 a game, but to set it up so that one of the players needs to lose $500 as a result of the freeze out.

This term refers to a shot in which there is a potential to make a mistake.

The term “tip tapper” refers to the tool that is used to scuff the tip of a cue so that it will hold chalk.

Many shots intended towards the side, as well as rail shots that must pass by the side, end up striking the side ‘tittie,’ resulting in a miss almost every time.

Players that routinely reach the finals of tournaments are sometimes referred to as “consistent finalist.” weight: As in, how much does it weigh?

I’m going to need some weight in order to play you “.

Example: If you are playing someone who is significantly worse than you at nineball, you can set the game up so that if they make the eight-ball, they will be victorious.

whitey: The cue ball, of course.

Between inferior players, there is a significant gap, but it is not a significant gap between champions.

Joe has two games on the wire as part of a race to nine, as in “Joe has two games on the wire as part of a race to nine.” A type of handicapping in which the player who receives games “on the line” has to win fewer games than his opponent is known as “on the wire handicapping.” In the aforementioned scenario, Joe just has to win seven games, but his opponent only needs to win nine games.

Billiards Terminology Glossary Full List

It is possible to utilize thebilliard terminology glossary by just clicking on the word or phrase that you are interested in. If you cannot find the billiard phrase that you are looking for in the database, please spend a few seconds to suggest a billiard term here. Choose a letter to search for:ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW

Billiards Terminology Glossary Full List

Beginning in 2005, with 150 billiard definitions divided into three sections, this billiard dictionary or terminology glossary was created. It has now evolved to become the world’s largest archive of cue sport words, with over 900 phrases organized into more than 11 categories and growing daily. Feeling a little lost when you walk into your neighborhood pool hall and have no idea what everyone is talking about? What do you think of when you hear terminology like “sharking,” “hooking,” “feather shots,” and “granny sticks?” Have you ever heard someone refer to a ball as being frozen, leaving you wondering if they’re referring to a new manner of preserving pool balls or something else?

  • When you hear comments like “You double kissed the 7 ball” and “The ball hit the tit,” do you find yourself taking a few steps back from the pool table?
  • This website aspires to be the most complete online resource for pool and billiards terms and definitions available.
  • Using this billiards vocabulary will not make you a more skilled pool player, though.
  • The Billiards Dictionary won’t improve your game, but at the very least it will help you understand what other players are saying when they’re conversing at the table.
  • If you’ve heard a billiard phrase that we don’t have in our dictionary, or if the billiard term that you’re looking for isn’t on this list, please take a few seconds to propose a billiard term to be included in our dictionary.

Billiards Terminology Glossary Full List

  • Billiardsforum has updated the Billiards Terminology Glossary Full List on 1/10/2018 at 4:23:48 AM. Title:Billiards Terminology Glossary Full List
  • Author:(Billiards Forum)
  • Published: 1/1 2006 2:33:47 PM
  • Last Updated: 1/10/2018 4:23:48 AM
  • Last Updated By: billiardsforum

Billiards Terminology Glossary Full List Comments

  1. On June 18, 2012 at 12:51:26 p.m., Saupil from Seoul, South Korea wrote: I’m at the Sang Lee tournament, and the word “series” keeps coming up in conversation. I’m looking for the definition of the term series as it pertains to billiards, specifically. On October 27, 2016, at 11:13:03 a.m., billiardsforum posted from Halifax, Nova Scotia. In cue sports, the term “series” typically refers to a group of competitions, such as, for example, the World Series of Cue.
  • Ontario Women’s Pool Championships
  • The Amateur Players Championship series of competitions, which takes place during the Super Billiards Expo, is one of the most thrilling aspects of the event.

The term “series” refers to a group of linked events or objects, such as all of a pool league’s tournaments for a particular year, or a collection of similar events or goods.

You may also encounter it in the context of product lines, such as a line of pool cues produced by a certain pool cue maker or a line of pool tables produced by a specific pool table manufacturer, for example:

  1. That is, it simply refers to the full line of cues in the collection of cues created by Meucci in that particular instance. Given the ambiguous nature of the topic, it is the most I can offer
  2. Nonetheless,

Submit New Billiard Term or Suggest a Correction

You can submit a new billiard phrase as well as its meaning in this section. If you’re recommending a change to an existing word, you should include the complete definition, including any changes you’d want to make.

Beginner Billiards Terms: Basic Pool Terminology

Billiards, sometimes known as pool, is a skill-based game that is played in bars, gaming rooms, and billiard halls all over the world by people of all ages. Professional billiards players put through countless hours of practice to achieve their level of proficiency, but even a novice pool player may enjoy this traditional game. The act of putting a ball into the pocket is a pleasant feeling, especially when you’re doing it with your friends and family by your side. If you’re considering about trying your hand at pool, you should be familiar with the lingo.

HB Home has put together this guide to assist you in understanding the most important billiards words and phrases so that you can jump straight into the action as soon as possible.

Basic Pool and Billiard Terminology

In order to assist you better grasp the game, below are some often used pool terms:

  • 8-Ball: This is the most often played variation of pool. It is played by two people, and the object of the game is for each player to get all of their balls into the holes before sinking the 8-ball to win. In this variant, one player is represented by stripes, while the other is represented by solids. The players in this variation of pool seek to strike the balls in numerical sequence rather than separating them into solids or stripes. 9-Ball: It is the player who is the first to hit the 9-ball into a hole who wins. This is the long wooden stick that you will use during the game to hit the cue ball and sink colored balls into the holes
  • It is also known as the cue ball stick. a cue tip is the fabric-covered end of a cue stick that is positioned on the smaller end of the cue stick
  • Cue stick butt: The butt of the cue stick is the larger end of the stick. In pool, the cue stick’s shaft is the smaller end. The grip of a cue stick refers to the method in which a player holds the butt of the cue stick in his or her hands. In pubs and pool rooms, you’ll see these little cubes of chalk strewn over the area around the pool tables. Use them to apply chalk to the tip of your cue stick, which is what you want to do. The cue stick will not slide off the cue ball if you do this during your shots. In order for the cue ball to roll into the colored and numbered balls on the pool table, you must strike the cue ball with your cue stick. The cue ball is usually white or off-white in color, although it can also have stains on the surface. When compared to the other balls on the table, the cue ball is somewhat bigger and heavier. Object balls: On a pool table, these are the balls that are not used as cue balls. They are numbered, with the highest number being 15 for a regular game of 8-ball. ObjECT BALLS are either totally colored or have a colorful stripe across their core, depending on the manufacturer. Solids: These item balls, which are numbered one through eight, are all the same hue. If you’re playing 8-ball, you could hear players refer to solids as “lows.” Stripes: These item balls are numbered nine through fifteen and have a ring of color around the centre of each. In the game of 8-ball, these are referred to as “highs.” In order to take your shot, you must first line up on the bridge and then take your shot. The bridge can be either one of your hands or a separate device that directs the cue stick toward the cue ball during your stroke, depending on your preference. Some individuals refer to the bridge as a crutch, despite the fact that crutch is a less often used term in pool and billiards. Rack: At the start of a game, this is the triangle-shaped gadget that is used to align the object balls in a specific pattern. As a verb, you can say things like “Would you like me to rack the balls first?” or “Would you like me to rack the balls first?”
  • Scratch: When the cue ball enters a pocket, it is referred to as scratching. When this occurs, the player who scratched is required to place one of the balls they had previously pocketed back onto the table. After then, the opponent has the opportunity to recover the cue ball and set it on the table in preparation for their next stroke. Obtain a ball by putting it in your pocket: In pool, when you strike the cue ball into an object ball and the object ball ends up in the pocket of another ball, you have pocketed that ball. You’ve moved one step closer to achieving victory in the game. You can continue to shoot shots after pocketing a ball unless you scratched during your turn, in which case your turn will be terminated.
See also:  Pool Table Anatomy: An Overview of Pool Table Parts and Layout

Parts of a Pool or Billiards Table

Different elements of the billiards table have different purposes, therefore it’s necessary to be familiar with the lingo associated with pool tables. You’ll be able to verify that you and your pals are playing a level playing field. Here are some words that you should be familiar with:

  • The bed of the table is a common word that refers to the fundamental table surface in pool and billiards. That area does not include the cushions, rails, or any other raised portions of the table
  • It is only the playing area. It should be noted that the pockets are not included in the bed of table. Cushions: These are triangular pieces of rubber wrapped in cloth that are placed around the perimeter of the table to protect it from scratches. They are referred to as “rails” by many gamers. Rails that are long: These are also referred to as “side rails” by players. These are the pool table’s two longest sides
  • The other two are shorter. Short rails: The two shorter sides of the pool table are referred to as short rails. A unique moniker has been assigned to each individual. Object ball rack: This is the small rail that runs along one side of the table and is where you rack the object balls. The head rail is a short rail that runs along the table’s edge on the other side from the foot rail. Pockets: These are the little openings that may be discovered between the pool table’s rails. They are positioned at each of the table’s four corners, as well as in the middle of each of the table’s two long rails. These are the areas where you will attempt to sink the object balls in order to win the game. These are forms that may be discovered in the wood of the rails and are uniformly distributed between each of the six compartments. A player may find them useful if they require a visual aid to assist them in lining up their shots. Strings: These are fictitious lines drawn across the pool table. The “long string” runs parallel to the long rails along the center of the pool table, down the centre of the table. The “head string” is an unseen line that runs parallel to the head rail, and the “foot string” is an invisible line that runs parallel to the foot rail, respectively. The “central string” is a line that connects the two centre pockets of the quilt. There are two obvious round stains on the surface of the pool table, which are evident in the photo. The junction of the long string and the head string is referred to as the “head spot.” The junction of the long string and the foot string is referred to as the “foot spot.” In tennis, the foot string is where the balls are stacked at the beginning of the game. Contact point: This is the precise point at which the cue ball makes contact with the object ball. Understanding the location of the contact point in billiards and pool may be a helpful tool in learning the fundamental mechanics and physics of the games. In order to better understand how the contact point impacts the outcome of the shot, an advanced player may film several such shots and then study the footage in slow motion.

Miscellaneous Pool Terms

Here are some other billiards phrases that you may find useful as you continue to play and improve your skills — as well as some new sorts of pool shots that you may try out:

  • Backspin: This occurs when a ball spins in the opposite direction of the direction in which it is going after a shot is taken. A call shot is a variation of the game in which the players describe what is going to happen on the table before taking their turns at the table. A common practice when playing 8-ball is for players to call the 8-ball shot while leaving all other shots in the game uncalled. During a call shot, this is the ball that has been designated as being the called ball. When referring to a called ball, you can say something like, “Three ball in the corner pocket,” or something similar. When a game ball is hit into one of the pockets on a pool or billiards table, it results in a victory for the person who struck it. When two object balls collide with one another during play, this is referred to as a kiss. When a kiss occurs by mistake, a kiss-out refers to the instant in which a shot misses its aim and is therefore considered to have occurred. When your opponent racks the balls, you conduct a break shot to take advantage of the situation. It is this shot that sends the grouped object balls flying in all directions, establishing the tone for the remainder of the game. When you wish to separate a cluster of object balls from one another, you can use the breakout shot, which is similar in concept to the break shot. Make use of it to make future shoots a little less difficult
  • In order to perform a bank shot, the cue ball must be hit off a cushion prior to making contact with the desired object ball. Jump shot: Stroke the cue ball at a downward angle, allowing the force of your strike to propel the cue ball into the air and score a point. Using this shot strategically, you can get an object ball to bounce over your opponent’s and strike one of your own. Those gathered around the table: It is expected that the cue ball will strike at least three of the table cushions before making contact with another ball during this sort of stroke. It takes time and effort to execute a superb around-the-table shot. It’s an excellent pool and billiards word to be familiar with and use
  • Middle hit: When you strike the cue ball in the center of the table in order to produce motion, the hit is referred to as a center hit. A ball that has been struck in the center will roll at a slower rate than the rest of the ball. English as it is spoken in the natural world: An alternative form of hit to a center hit, a natural english style of hit entails striking the cue ball from a place distant from the center in order to produce a more obvious sidespin movement. Generally speaking, natural english struck cue balls pick up more speed than center hit cue balls

HB Home Has the Perfect Pool Tables for Any Game Room

The home is a place where friends and family members gather to share experiences and create memories that will last a lifetime. In our objective at HB Home, we want to assist you in furnishing your game room with high-quality gaming furniture, so that it becomes the go-to spot where your family and friends can congregate to have a good time and catch up. We have a large selection of pool tables and pool table accessories, as well as a variety of other classic games that the whole family will enjoy.

Pool Players Glossary of Terms

Jennifer Barretta contributed to this article. For those of you who have spent a lot of time in the pool room, you’ve undoubtedly come across several words and phrases that you’ve never heard before outside of the pool room. The ability to not only walk the walk, but also talk the talk is an important part of being a competent player. Take a few minutes to make sure you understand the meaning of these typical pool hall idioms before you start playing. Rack Mechanic: A person who inspects the rack and learns a great deal about what will happen on the break is known as a rack mechanic.

They are also skilled at making balls go into rack your own events, which they do on a regular basis.

“Hey, make sure you go over the rack with this person and examine it.” He’s a rack mechanic, by the way.” Googan: A pool googan is a person who possesses every pool gadget, movie, and book known to the billiard business at their disposal.

It is quite unusual for googans to develop into good players.

Rail Bird: These are the men that hang around in the pool room all of the time but never pick up a pool cue to play.

If you ever want to know how someone plays, just ask your friendly neighborhood rail bird; but, if you’re seeking to wager, don’t put your faith in his response.

Because the seeded players often receive byes in the first round, the players who are assigned to the first round matches are referred to as the rail checkers (because they miss a lot).

He distributes money in the manner of, well, you know.

“Here comes my ATM,” says the teller.

As a thank you for driving me to the competition, I gave him a little gapper.

A variation on this theme is the “Roll Without Butter,” in which the ball is slopped, but the player gets snookered instead.

‘That was a buttery roll,’ I said.

“He slopped in the nine ball, and I went into pure meltdown mode,” I said.

Generally speaking, this is a backhanded praise since it implies that, despite the fact that you make the balls effectively, your position play is subpar.

He’s a master of the shot.” Go out and get some pool practice now that you’ve learned how to speak like a true pool player, so that you can play like one as well. Perhaps you’ll even come upon your own own ATM!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *