Dos Card Game Rules and How to Play

Dos Card Game Rules and How to Play

Our in-depth guide to the Dos card game will teach you all you need to know about the game. Dos incorporates features of Uno while being a distinct and entertaining card game in its own right. If you enjoy Uno, though, Dos is a game that is easy to suggest. With this comprehensive guide to the Dos card game, we’ll cover all you need to know about the game. We’ll also take a look at the equipment you’ll need to play, as well as a brief look at the game’s origins and history.

What is The Dos Card Game?

Dos is a very new game, having been launched only a few months ago in 2018. Dos was published and manufactured by Mattel, and it was even touted as a spin-off of the popular game Uno at one time. The cards even have a similar design to one another. A large number of gameplay components are shared throughout the two games as well. Despite their similarities, they both manage to maintain their individuality and distinctiveness. It’s important to be the first player to use up all of your cards in both games.

You may make matches between cards based on their number and color.

  1. Wild cards emerge in the same way as they do in Uno.
  2. Dos cards, which are used to represent two of any hue, are also utilized.
  3. But first, let’s take a look at the equipment you’ll need to play.
  4. The DOS game, as previously stated, is released by Mattel.
  5. Like thisDOS card playing set, you can also easily find them on the internet with little difficulty.
  6. A Dos card set contains 112 cards in total.
  7. We’ll go through the three different types of cards in Dos to help you better comprehend the game’s rules.

Numbered Cards

Cards with numbers on them make up a large portion of the deck in Dos. These cards behave in a similar way to those seen in the game of Uno. To make use of them, you must first match up the numbers. Numbered cards are available in four various colors: red, green, yellow, and blue. They are also available in a variety of sizes.

Wild Cards

They function in a similar fashion to the wild cards that were formerly used in Uno. These cards can be used to represent any number. The wild cards are also available in the same four colors as the numbered cards: red, yellow, blue, and green. These cards may be quite useful to players, so if you are fortunate enough to obtain one (or more), make smart use of them.

Dos Cards

Dos cards function in a similar way to how ordinary wild cards function.

These cards, on the other hand, can be used as two of any number and color. These cards are once again quite favorable and will prove to be extremely valuable to any player who chooses to use them.

The Dos Card Game Rules and Gameplay

The objective of Dos is straightforward: you must be the first player to use all of your cards. The points will be awarded to you based on the cards that remain in your opponent’s hand. The winner will be determined by who is the first to score at least 200 points. You may also play Dos without having to worry about keeping score. If you are not playing for points, the person who utilizes all of his or her cards first will be the winner! The next step is to go through how to set up and play the Dos card game.

Setting Up and Playing Dos

To begin, one player should shuffle the deck of cards with the other players’ help. Following that, each player should be given seven cards. Place the deck face down in the center of the table and turn two cards over face up. Players will begin with these cards as their starting point. Dos is a fantastic card game for two players, but it may be played with a maximum of four players. Once all of the players have been handed their cards, they will need to begin utilizing them immediately. Starting with the player who dealt the cards and working their way clockwise, each player should attempt to place at least one card on the table.

  1. Matches are available in a variety of shapes and colors, as well as by number.
  2. Single Match: When you match cards based on their numbers, you are said to have made a single match.
  3. Double Match: When you utilize two cards to match the number on the base card, this is referred to as a double match.
  4. It is possible to layer a red 2 and a green 2 on top of a yellow 4 to achieve this effect.
  5. Afterwards, remove two additional cards from the deck and set them face down on the table.
  6. Although it is possible to match colors before you move, it is best to do it beforehand.
  7. However, if you are able to match cards based on color, you will be able to get rid of more cards in a single round.

We’ve explained the steps involved in using color matching below.

You could, for example, lay a red 5 card on top of another red 5 card to make a five.

They’ll also have to be the same shade of blue.

If you make a single-color match, you can play another of your cards by adding it to the base cards you just made.

Every other player will be required to pick up a card if you are successful in matching two colors!

However, we should reaffirm what we’ve said previously.

Dos cards, on the other hand, may be used to represent two numbers of any color. As a result, these cards are extremely important since they essentially provide a shortcut to obtaining a double color match.

Winning Dos

When you’re down to your final two cards, the first thing you should remember is that you need to call out Dos. Alternatively, you will be required to draw another two cards and add them to your hand if you fail to do so. The round is won by the player who is the first to use all of his or her cards. The standard score-based rules of the Dos card game will require you to total up your points if you are playing the game with them. The player who won their round is awarded points depending on the number of cards that were left in their opponent’s hand at the end of the round.

The winner of the game is the first player to earn 200 points!

Dos – A Fun Twist On Traditional Uno

Dos is an original and entertaining card game that is guaranteed to be a success at your next game night gathering! The game is straightforward and suitable for family play, but there is also plenty of space for more strategic play as you go through the levels. If you like Unothen, you’ll probably like Dos as well.

Dos Rules

If Uno denotes one, then Dos denotes a pair. Dos is the sequel to Uno, and it is your lucky day. Dos is a card game that was released by Mattel in early 2018 and is a really fascinating card game in its own right. The card games Uno and Dos may appear to be extremely similar at first glance, but upon closer examination, you will discover that they are in fact very different. Let’s take a closer look at Dos in more detail. Dos can be played by 2-4 people, which is much smaller than the number of people that can play Uno.

  • Each color contains three cards with the numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, and two cards with the numbers 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10.
  • Aside from that, there are two Wildcards for each of the four colors available.
  • Objective The fundamental goal of Dos is to discard all of the cards in one’s hand before anyone else does (and to collect points from the cards that are still in other players’ hands after they have been discarded).
  • First, the numbers must be matched, and then just the color is noted, followed by the rest of the instructions.
  • The victor of the game is the first player to obtain a score of 200 points (or any other amount that the players agree upon).

Coloured Wildcards (which may represent any number) and Wild Dos cards (which are “2” in number) are the two types of wild cards “cards that can be used to represent any color); and Wild Dos card– The number 2 cards in Dos are represented by these Wild cards, which may take on any color that the player (who is now in the process of playing) chooses to symbolize them.

  1. Wildcard– The Wildcard may be used to represent any number for whatever color that it appears in.
  2. If a Wildcard is drawn from the Draw pile, the player whose turn it is to play can choose what number the Wildcard should be paired with.
  3. The simplest method of selecting a dealer is for everyone to draw a card from the deck, with the person who pulls the card with the highest face number being designated as the dealer (put back any Wild cards).
  4. Always keep in mind that the Center Row must always have a minimum of two cards face up.
  5. What method do you use to match cards?
  6. Cards in the Center Row can be matched by Single matches and Double matches, and the cards in the Center Row can be matched by both.
  7. If there are four cards in the Center Row, you can match cards to ALL four of them as long as you have matching cards in your hand; however, you can only match a maximum of two cards to a single Center Row card in any one game.

Replace the cards in the Center Row with a new card from the Draw pile, and then turn over a new card from the Draw pile.

As an illustration, match a Red 3 with a Green 3.

This is called a double match.

Single Color Match– Match cards by both number and color in a single color match.

For example, you may match a Red 3 with a Red 3 from your hand to win.

Whenever you receive two or more Single Color Matches on the same two Center Rows, you can discard cards from your hand by placing them in the Center Row for each of the Single Color Matches.

As an illustration, pair a Red 5 with a Red 1 and a Red 4.

A Double Color Match permits you to discard one card from your hand by placing it in the Center Row AND requires all other players to DRAW one card from the Draw pile if you receive one of the cards.

Note: Any cards that you are entitled to discard from your hand onto the Center Row (either as a result of receiving a Color Match Bonus or simply because you have nothing to match) should be placed on the Center Row last, after any cards that should be refilled from the Draw pile have been placed on the Center Row.

  1. Bringing your Turn to a close If you don’t have any cards to match, you must draw a card from the Draw pile to complete the match.
  2. But even if you don’t have a card that matches it, you must still discard one from your hand by placing it in the Center Row of the table.
  3. Take all of the matched cards from the Center Row and place them all in the Discard pile to the right.
  4. Note:You are not allowed to match any of the new cards once they are refilled even if there are new matches available, as you have already done all your matches earlier.
  5. There is no limit to how many cards can be present in the Center Row, but the minimum is always two cards.
  6. If you only have a single card to match, play it and then end your turn, or if you have say, four or five cards to match, then play them all and then end your turn.
  7. Once you have exactly TWO cards in your hand, remember to yell out “Dos”.
  8. Obtaining Victory in the Game The first player who discards all his/her cards is the winner of the round.

The winner of the round gets to score points from all the cards in other player’s hands and become the dealer for the next round. Scoring is as below:

  • All number cards are for their face value
  • Wild Dos cards are worth 20 points each
  • And Wildcards are worth 40 points apiece.

According to the official regulations, the game is won by the person who accumulates 200 points the shortest amount of time. However, this number is not fixed in stone, and you may absolutely increase or reduce the number of points required to win the game — as long as everyone is on board with the change. Dos and Don’ts Strategy In Dos, the focus is mostly on stopping your opponents from going out too early while simultaneously discarding as many cards as possible every turn. When your opponent has a large number of cards, one tactic is to put down cards with tiny numbers at the beginning of the game, as these are less likely to be matched with two cards.

  • When dealing with a 10, it is easier to match it with other numbers, such as a 1+9, a 5+5, a Wild Dos (indicating 2)+8, or a 3+3.
  • A Double Color Match bonus may even be awarded to your opponent if they play two cards of the same color at the same time.
  • Alternatively, if your opponent just has a few cards, it may be a preferable tactic to play large number cards such as 9 or 10 if at all feasible, as he or she may not have enough cards to combine and match with that large number card in such situation.
  • Dos is unquestionably more fast-paced than Uno, and its rules are also a touch more intricate.
  • Getting a fortuitous sequence of matching cards may swiftly put an end to a game before the other players have even had a chance to become comfortable.
  • Does have its own attraction, and it is something that every real Uno enthusiast should experience at least once in their lifetime.
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DOS Card Game Review and Rules

If you ask the average person to name a card game, one of the first things comes to mind is undoubtedly UNO. Originally released in 1971, the game of UNO is likely to have been played by the majority of individuals at some point in their life. Playing cards from your hand that are either the same number or color as the last played card is the basic principle of the game. Because of the widespread popularity of UNO, a slew of spin-off games have been developed throughout the years. For the most part, these games comprised adapting the rules of UNO and applying them to several different kinds of board games.

It only took 47 years for the successor to UNO to be released, so I was interested to see how it would end out. Despite the fact that DOS is an unauthorized successor to UNO, the game differs significantly from the original, which is both a positive and a negative in certain respects.

How to Play DOS

  • Each player takes a turn drawing a card. The first dealer will be the one who has drawn the greatest number. The dealer shuffles the cards and distributes seven cards to each player
  • The dealer then lays the top two cards of the deck face up on the table to begin the game. The remaining cards are shuffled and placed face down to form the draw pile.

Playing the Game

The round will be initiated by the player to the left of the dealer. On a player’s turn, they will choose between two possible actions:

Playing Cards

Players will attempt to play cards that have the same numerical value as the numbers on the face-up cards. If the colors on the cards that are being played do not match the colors on the cards that are being matched, players can still make matches. The next player must choose between matching the blue nine and matching the yellow three. If you have a face-up card, there are two methods to match it. For starters, a player can play a card that has a numerical value that perfectly matches the number on one of the face-up cards (single number match).

Alternatively, a player can play two cards that sum up to the value of one of the face-up cards in the deck (double number match).

On two of the face-up cards in the middle of the table, a player has the option of playing a single number match or a double number match on the same card.

Color Match

The ability to match colors is not required when playing cards, but if the player is successful in doing so, they will gain an additional bonus. The amount of extra money a player earns is determined by whether or not they make a single or double number match. One color match is established when a player plays one card that matches the number and color of one of the face-up cards. This is known as a single color match. They will be allowed to place one of the cards from their hand face up on the table to begin the game.

This player has placed a blue five on the table in order to match the blue five that was previously there.

Each player’s turn will conclude with them placing one of the cards from their hand face up on the table, so producing another pile of cards to play from.

This player has used a yellow four and a three to match the color of the yellow seven on the board.

Draw A Card

Players will draw from the draw pile if they are unable to match one of the face-up cards or do not choose to match one of the face-up cards. It is possible to make a match with one of the face-up cards using the card you just drew after you have finished drawing.

If a player’s hand does not contain any cards that correspond to any of the cards on the table, they will be given the opportunity to place one of the cards from their hand face up on the table. This will result in the creation of another pile to play on.

End of Turn

It is the conclusion of a player’s turn once he or she has either played or drawn a card. There is a complete removal of all matched paired cards from the table and their placement into the discard pile. If there are less than two face-up cards in the middle of the table, select a card or cards from the top of the draw pile and lay them face-up on the table to complete the deal. If a player is awarded the opportunity to lay down a card or cards for color matches, they will do so face up after the cards from the draw pile have been added to the deck.

Special Cards

In DOS, there are two unique cards to be found. WILDFIRE DOS: A wildfire DOS card counts as a pair of any color. When you play the card, you get to choose the color of the suit it is in. When you match a wild DOS card that is face up on the table, you have the option of determining what color the card is. The Wild DOS card will function as a blue two in the game. In addition to the blue three, this player produced a two-card color match with the red three. Wildcards: A wildcard can represent any number between 1 and 10 of the color shown on the card.

When a wildcard is placed face up on the table, the player who matches it gets to select which number it is.

The wildcard will operate as a four in order to achieve a color match between two cards.

DOS

In the event that a player only has two cards remaining in his or her hand, he or she must state DOS. If you are caught by another player without saying DOS, you will be forced to add two cards from the draw pile to your hand as a penalty. The two cards will be dealt to you at the end of your turn if you are called out while you are taking your turn.

End of Round

The round is over when one of the players discards their final card from their hand. The player who was successful in getting rid of all of their cards will receive points depending on the cards that are still in the hands of the other players. The following are the points that cards are worth:

  • Number cards are for their face value
  • Wild DOS are worth 20 points
  • Wild are worth 40 points.

The following points will be awarded to the player who wins this round: yellow Wild – 40 points, Wild DOS – 20 points, and number cards – 28 points (5 + 4+ 10+ 6 + 3) for the round.

End of Game

The winner of the game is the first player to reach 200 points.

My Thoughts on DOS

I’ll admit that when I first heard about DOS, I was a little sceptical about it. UNO is a simple game with limited depth, yet it has always had a special place in my heart. UNO is a game that requires very little strategy and a great deal of chance, but for some reason it is successful. I believe that one of the reasons I enjoy UNO is that it is the sort of game in which you can simply sit back and enjoy yourself without having to put any thinking into what you are doing at all. This is what makes UNO such a great filler card game to play on the go.

  • Despite the fact that the game is never formally referred to as a successor to UNO, the game is played as if it were.
  • To give you an example, I anticipated that the game would only provide you with a few different cards and perhaps a second play pile in relation to the game’s name DOS.
  • It is rather obvious that DOS draws influence from the United Nations.
  • To achieve this, you must match the numbers on your cards to the numbers on the table that have been laid out.
  • Therefore, I believe DOS is a rather nice filler card game if you’re looking for something that doesn’t need you to put much effort into.
  • The most significant distinction between DOS and UNO is the focus placed on numbers rather than colors.
  • In DOS, however, this is not the case because you cannot match cards based just on their color.

In DOS, however, this is far from the case, and in fact, it is the polar opposite.

This is due to three regulations that were added to DOS that have a substantial impact on the gameplay.

In DOS, this limitation is no longer in effect.

It is only logical that it is simpler to get rid of your cards when you have the ability to play at least twice as many cards every turn as you did previously.

The players do not have to play cards that exactly match the numbers on the cards on the table; instead, they can play two cards that sum up to the number on one of the face up cards on the table.

When at all feasible, you should play two cards in order to expedite the process of getting rid of cards.

This really adds a little educational component to the game, as I could see DOS being used to teach younger students the fundamentals of addition and subtraction.

The colors you choose have no effect on your ability to participate in a match in the game.

You can even play two cards that sum up to a face-up card, and neither card has to be the same color as the face-up card in order for it to be legal.

After a lengthy period of time of playing UNO, it is a little strange to be able to disregard the colors on the cards.

The benefits that you obtain for matching colors can be quite beneficial in the game’s progression.

You can get rid of one of your cards that will be difficult to get rid of while also lowering the amount of cards you have in your hand at the same time.

This gives you a four-card edge over the other players, giving you the upper hand.

When these three factors come together, it becomes quite simple to get rid of the cards in your hand.

It is theoretically feasible to get rid of six cards in a single round when playing DOS.

This gives players the ability to drastically alter the outcome of a round in a single round.

In DOS, most rounds will be completed after a few of trips around the table, with each round taking little more than a couple of minutes on average.

As I previously stated, the game’s rounds move far more quickly than in previous versions.

In this game, there is no need to be concerned about the fabled UNO rounds that never seem to end because players are unable to discard their final card.

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With games lasting only a few minutes, it is not necessary to play for an extended period of time in order for a player to earn 200 points.

Despite the fact that I have always loved UNO, I would not classify it as a strategic game.

Although there are a limited number of decisions to be made in the game, it is typically rather evident what you should do on any given turn.

This is mostly due to the ability to play one or two cards to match a card, as well as receiving a bonus for matching colors, among other things.

The majority of the issues that I encountered with DOS stemmed from the fact that the game goes too far in making it simple to match cards with one another.

While I appreciate that this expedites the rounds, I believe that it speeds up the game too much in the process.

Because of these characteristics, rounds appear to be completed almost as fast as they are initiated.

Another issue with DOS is that it removes a significant amount of the player engagement from UNO’s gameplay.

It is possible to have a significant effect on the outcome of the game by controlling the card the next player must match.

In DOS, almost all of this is no longer necessary.

Apart from the possibility of compelling a player to draw a card as a result of playing a two-card color match, you have no actual influence on the other players.

Unlike other games, DOS does not have features like as skips, reverses, draw twos, and so on.

In the game of Uno, you might utilize these cards to keep a player from being eliminated.

Because player contact is such a crucial aspect of UNO, it is instantly apparent that it is badly lacking in DOS as well.

The good fortune comes from a number of diverse sources.

The cards that are dealt face up decide whether or not you will be able to play cards, as well as how many cards you will be able to play at a time.

Basically, you want wild cards or cards with greater numbers face up on the table when it’s your turn.

When it comes to the cards that are given to you, you want to be handed a large number of low-numbered cards as well as special cards.

The special cards, in particular, are quite effective.

The cards, on the other hand, are completely manipulated.

They are even more powerful because you can combine them with any of your other cards, making it simple to use them to complete a two-card match.

Component by component DOS is very much what you’d expect from a Mattel card game in terms of gameplay.

The design of the cards is fairly similar to one another.

They aren’t very noteworthy, yet they fulfill their intended function.

It’s a complicated situation.

According to the official rules, I believe that UNO is the superior game because it is more elegant and functions better as a filler card game for larger groups.

It’s simply that it feels like something is missing from the game.

Some decent house rules, such as limiting the number of cards you may play each round, would almost certainly make the game far better. While I believe that UNO is the superior game, I believe that DOS has the potential to become the superior game with some decent home rules.

Should You Buy DOS?

I wasn’t sure what to make of DOS, which was billed as a “unofficial successor” to the hit game UNO. I was under the impression that it was going to be another UNO offshoot with a few minor adjustments to the rules. In spite of the fact that DOS draws influence from UNO, it is quickly apparent that the two games do not have quite the amount of similarities that the player may assume. The most significant differences are that you are no longer required to match colors (apart from bonuses) and that you are permitted to play more cards every round.

  • Because the game requires you to make certain strategic decisions, DOS appears to have a little more strategy than other games.
  • DOS also lacks a significant amount of the player interaction found in UNO.
  • It is unlikely that DOS will appeal to those who have never been particularly fond of basic filler card games.
  • In the event that you anticipate DOS to play a lot like UNO, you may be disappointed.
  • However, if the premise of the game appeals to you and you enjoy basic card games, it may be worthwhile to give DOS a try.

DOS Game Rules – How To Play DOS

DOS is a card game with a hand shedding mechanic that was released by Mattel in 2017. It is seen as a more difficult follow-up to the United Nations. In this variation of the game, players are still competing to be the first to empty their hand, but instead of playing a single card to a single discard pile, players are making matches to numerous cards in the middle of the playing space. Players can make matches with one or two cards, but they must match by number in order to win. Color match bonuses are also available, and they allow the player to discard even more cards from their hand than they would otherwise.

MATERIALS

The DOS deck consists of 108 cards: 24 blue cards, 24 green cards, 24 red cards, 24 yellow cards, and 12 wild DOS cards. There are 24 blue cards, 24 green cards, 24 red cards, 24 yellow cards, and 12 wild DOS cards. WILDCARD The Wildcard may be used to represent any number in the color of the card. When the card is played, it is necessary to proclaim the number.

DOS CARD WITHOUT RESTRICTIONS It is possible to use the Wild DOS card as a 2 of any color. When a player plays a card, the color is determined by the player. A player determines what color the Wild Dos card is if it is located in the Center Row, and they match to that color as they match to it.

SETUP

To choose who will be the first dealer, a deck of cards is used. The person who drew the highest-ranking card is the one who deals first. All cards that are not numbers have no value. Shuffle the deck and deal seven cards to each player. Rest of deck should be positioned with its back to you in the center of your playing zone. Place two cards next to each other on the table. This is what is known as the Center Row (CR). A discard pile will be generated on the opposite side of the draw pile from where the draw pile was established.

THE PLAY

During the course of the game, players attempt to remove cards from their hands by making matches with the cards that are currently in their possession. There are several approaches that may be used to accomplish this.

NUMBER MATCHES

Single Match: Only one card is dealt to the CR that matches the number on the card. When playing a Double Match, two cards are dealt with numbers on them that when combined together have the same value as one of the CRcards. Each card can be matched by a player in the CRone time.

COLOR MATCHES

If the card or cards played are likewise the same color as the CRcard, players will get a Color Match Bonus for their efforts. Every single match counts toward earning the prize. Single Color Match: If the card played to the CR matches in both number and color, the player may place another card from their hand face up in the CR to complete the match. The number of cards located in the CR grows as a result of this. The other players are penalized by drawing one card from the draw pile if aDouble Matchis made that adds up to the number and both cards are the same color as the CRcard.

DRAWING

Any cards that cannot or do not wish to be played are drawn from the draw pile by the player who cannot play any cards. If the player believes the card may be matched to the CR, he or she may proceed. The player who draws the most cards and is unable to make a match increases the number of cards in the CR by one.

ENDING THE TURN

The end of a player’s turn is marked by the collection of any matching cards that were played to theCRalong with theCRcards on which the matches were played. That set of cards is discarded into the discard pile. Whenever there are less than two CRcards remaining, replenish the deck with two more from the draw pile. If the player has earned any Color Match Bonuses, they should also include their cards in theCRas as a result. Additionally, it is possible for theCR to include more than 2 cards. Keep in mind that a player can match as many cards as possible in the given amount of time.

ENDING THE ROUND

When a player has eliminated all of the cards from his or her hand, the round is over. That player will receive points for the remaining cards in the hands of the other players.

Everyone else must draw before the final score for the round can be calculated if the player who goes out receives a Double Color Match bonus throughout the round. The game will continue to be played until the endgame condition is reached.

SCORING

The player who emptied their hand wins points for the cards that are still in the possession of their opponents. Number cards are equal to the value of the number printed on each card. Each wild DOS is worth 20 points. Wild equals 40 points for each.

WINNING

The winner is determined by who is the first to reach 200 points or more. Mark is a game media content creator that works on a variety of projects. He does research and teaches card, dice, and domino games to anybody who is interested in learning more about them. He hopes to one day manage a gaming club. Riffle ShuffleRoll is a YouTube channel where you can see more of his work. Mark Ball’s most recent blog entries (see all) Loading.

How to play DOS

  • 24 blue cards, 24 green cards, 24 red cards, 24 yellow cards, and 12 wild DOS cards are used in this game.

Object of the Game

Be the first player to get rid of all of your cards in each round by matching cards with the center row and gaining points from the cards that remain in the hands of the other participants. The winner of the game is the first player to achieve 200 points.

Setup

  1. Each player takes a turn drawing a card
  2. The person who draws the largest number of cards deals (any card with a symbol is treated as a zero). The dealer shuffles the deck and distributes seven cards to each player. For the “Center Row,” the dealer sets two cards face up in the center of the playing area to produce a “Center Column.” Place the deck next to the Center Row, allowing enough room for a discard pile
  3. And

Game Play

The person on the left of the dealer is the one who starts the game. Each round, you must either MATCH one or both of the cards in Center Row with cards from your hand, or DRAW one or both of the cards in Center Row.

Match

There are two methods in which you can play cards from your hand on cards in the Center Row: A single match is made when a single card is played that has a number that matches that of one of the cards in the Center Row. For example, if you have a 7 in your hand and one of the cards in the Center Row is also a 7, you may play your 7 regardless of the color of the other cards in the Center Row. Double Match: Make a pair of cards that sum up to one of the cards in the Center Row by playing two cards on the same turn.

It is possible to make a match on each of the cards in the Center Row if you are able to do so, but you may only do it once on each of the cards.

Color Match Bonus

Whenever you make a match in the Center Row with a card that has the same color as the one you are matching with, you will receive a Color Match Bonus for that match. For a Single Color Match: If your playing card matches the number AND color of a card in the Center Row, you may discard one card from your hand and place it face-up in the Center Row at the conclusion of your turn. In the following example, if you have a Red 7 in your hand and one of the cards in the Center Row is also a Red 7, you will receive a Single Color Match Bonus when your hand matches the card in the Center Row.

Consider the following scenario: if the first card in the Center Row is a Red 7, and you play TWO red cards that total up to seven, you receive a Double Color Match Bonus.

Draw

It is necessary to draw one card if you are unable (or do not choose to) make a match. If you are able to create a match after drawing, you are welcome to do so. After drawing and failing to find a match, place one card from your hand face up in the center of the Center Row to finish the game.

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End of the Turn

Take all of the cards you’ve played so far, including the cards from the Center Row on which you’ve used them, and place them all into the discard pile. If there are less than two cards in the Center Row at this point, replenish it with cards from the deck until there are two cards in the Center Row at this point again. Following that, if you received any Color Match Bonuses during that turn, remember to place one card from your hand face up in the Center Row for each Color Match Bonus you received.

As a result, on occasion, there will be more than two cards in the Center Row during a player’s turn when the game begins.

Note: If there are more than two cards in the middle row, you may choose to match any or all of the cards on the board.

Special Cards

In Double Matches, the Wild DOS card counts as a 2 of any color, which makes it very valuable for establishing a Double Match. When you play the Wild DOS card, you get to choose the color of the card. If the Wild DOS card is face up in the Center Row, you have the option of deciding what color it is when you match it to another card on the same row. Examples include: If the Center Row has a Red 7, and you have a Red 5 and a Wild DOS card in your hand, you might play a Red 5 and a Wild DOS card combination on the Red 7, then designate the Wild DOS red to obtain the Double Color Match.

WildCard

The Wildcard may be used to represent any number from 1 to 10 in the color of the card. When you play the Wildcard, you get to choose what number it will be. If the Wildcard is face up in the Center Row, you get to choose the number you want to match to it when you match to the Wildcard. Consider the following scenario: if the Center Row contains a Red 7, you can choose a 7 as your Wildcard and create a Single Match. A Single Color Match can be made if your Wildcard is red, and you have a red Wildcard.

To do so, designate the Wildcard as a 4 and play them on the 7.

Going Out

If you ever find yourself with EXACTLY TWO CARDS in your hand, you must call out “DOS!” (meaning “two”).

If you neglect to do so and another player yells out “DOS!” before you, you will be forced to draw two cards as a result of the oversight. You should not add any penalty cards to your hand during your turn if this occurs during your turn.

End of the Round

The round comes to a close when one of the players is eliminated by discarding all of the cards in his or her hand. That player receives points for the cards that have been left in the hands of the other players. Remember to make the other players draw cards before scoring if the player won any Double Color Match Bonuses on the turn they went out if they earned any on the round they went out.

Scoring

All number cards (1, 3-10) Face Value
Wild DOS 20 Points
Wild 40 Points

Make a separate piece of paper for each player’s score and keep it safe (not included). The dealer for the following round is chosen from among the winners of the previous round.

End of the Game

The winner of the game is the first player to achieve 200 points. Read on for more information.

DOS: Rules and Gameplay Instructions

Learn the DOS rules for a terrific card game substitute if you’re looking for an alternative to UNO that yet follows the same competitive gameplay that players are already accustomed with. Combining elements from UNO and even parts of the Phase 10 rules, DOS is a game that emphasizes numbers rather than colors throughout the course of the game. According to its level of complexity, DOS falls between between UNO and Phase 10, making it an excellent transitional game if you’re trying to increase the challenge of your card games by increasing the number of players.

What is DOS?

DOS may be thought as as a sequel or successor to UNO, and it adheres to many of the same principles as the Classic UNO ruleset. Players fight to get rid of their cards in the same way they do in UNO, and much as in Spicy UNO, additional rules have been added to help them accomplish this goal, such as new Wildcards for players. Associated with:Spicy UNO rules The most essential distinction between UNO and DOS for players to remember is that they will need to yell ‘DOS’ when they have two cards remaining instead of one when they have one card left.

  1. Who Can Participate: Anyone aged 7 and up.
  2. The duration of the performance is 15-20 minutes.
  3. Main The goal of the game is to be the first player to reach 200 points across a number of rounds in order to win.
  4. DOS has unique wildcards that allow you to entirely alter the course of the game as you play it.

Playing DOS – What You’ll Need.

To play DOS, you’ll need to equip yourself with the appropriate equipment, just like you would for other card games. ThisDOS set comes with a collectors tin that will keep your cards safe and secure. Inside the tin, you’ll find the following items:

  • A total of 24 Blue cards, 24 Green cards, 24 Red cards, 24 Yellow cards, and 12 Wild DOS Cards are available.

Our Personal Favorite Check out the waterproof variant of the DOS Splashas as well so that you may play in the pool without worrying about your cards getting spoilt in the summer.

How To Set Up DOS

Allow all players to draw cards, with the dealer being the person who draws the card with the largest number of pips. Distribute seven cards to each participant after shuffling the deck with all of the cards present. Placing the deck face down in the centre and drawing the top two cards, then placing the top two cards face up next to the deck in two distinct heaps to form the Center Row.

Make a space adjacent to the cards that will serve as a discard pile for players to place their used cards throughout the course of the game.

DOS Rules

Players utilize the cards that are in theCentre Row during the game to get rid of their cards, and because these cards are chosen at random, each round is different from the last.

Starting the Game

The player who is sitting to the left of the dealer is the one who initiates the game. In DOS, players fight to get rid of all of their cards in a manner similar to that of UNO. This can be accomplished in one of two ways:

  • A single match– If a player’s card corresponds to either a number or a card in the Center Row, they may place their card on top of the pile. Double match – If the sum of two players’ cards equals the sum of one of the cards in the Center Row, the players may place both cards on top of the pile.

If the beginning player is unable to proceed, they may choose to play one of the cards in their hand or to draw a card from the draw pile. The game proceeds to the left, with each player completing their turn one at a time until the game is completed.

How to Play DOS

When players have two cards remaining, instead of the customary one card in UNO, they must yell ‘DOS’ to signal that they have completed their elimination of all their cards and win the game. To allow players to get rid of their cards, DOS places two cards in the Center Row. However, players can raise the number of cards in the Center Row by doing one of the following things:

  • If a player matches the color and number of a card in the Center Row, he or she receives a single color match. When a player has two cards of the same color that sum up to the same card number in the Center Row, this is known as a Double Color Match.

If a player is successful in landing a Double Color Match, all of the other players are required to draw a card from the draw pile as well. For every card in the Center Row, players can additionally play one set of cards from their hand. When two cards are in the Center Row, players have the option of placing as many of their cards from their hand as they choose on both sets of cards. The following are some DOS wildcards that players may encounter while participating in the game:

  • DOS Card with All Four Game Colors – The numbered cards are enclosed by a circle with all four game colors. Players can use this in place of any other color, and they can determine which color players must adhere to next. WildCard– This card may be used to represent any number needed, and each WildCard has a distinct colored backdrop.

The round concludes as soon as a player has eliminated all of his or her cards, and the scores are put together.

Scoring In DOS

When playing DOS, a player must earn 200 points over the course of several rounds to win. After each round, a score is assigned to the winning player based on the cards that the other players hold in their hands at the conclusion of the round. You may use the following chart to figure out how many points each card left over is worth:

  • Number cards are worth the value stated on the card
  • Wild DOS Cards are worth 20 points per card
  • WildCards are worth 40 points per card
  • And Wild DOS Cards are worth 20 points per card.

Frequently Asked Questions

One of the most significant distinctions between DOS and UNO is that there are two game piles utilized during games in DOS, and in DOS you match numbers rather than colors instead of matching colors.

Can you play DOS with UNO cards?

The complete version of DOS would not be playable using UNO cards, as UNO does not provide the required WIldcards that you’ll need to play the game. Instead of playing UNO, you may try out one of the many different games that you can play using UNO cards.

What is the discard pile used for in DOS?

Some versions of DOS allow players to discard cards from their hands and draw fresh cards in order to make the game more accessible to newbies. You are not required to follow this rule, and it is only in place to make the game more enjoyable.

Alternative Games to DOS

However, there is no shortage of alternativeUNOgames to choose from, and we have taken it upon ourselves to enlighten you about each one through our in-depth guide to alternativeUNOgames.

Each one is based on a similar principle to UNO, but with a unique twist to keep things exciting for your friends and loved ones. All additional UNO games are as follows:

  • The classic game of Uno
  • The spicy game of Uno
  • The game of Uno
  • The game of Uno Colors Rule
  • The game of Uno Dice
  • The game of Uno Disney
  • The game of Uno Dominos
  • The game of Uno House Rules
  • The game of Uno Master
  • The game of Uno Moo
  • The game

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