What is a Scratch in Pool – Game Rules

What Is A Scratch In Pool? Rules for Scratching in Billiards

If you’ve ever played pool, there’s a good possibility it’s happened to you at some point. As the cue ball heads straight for a pocket after an errant stroke, your heart falls a little bit further. That’s the end of the game. Your opponent has complete control over where the ball is placed on the table. Can he, or can’t he? Is the positioning restricted to the area beneath the head string? Or to the side of the table where the cue ball had scraped the surface of the table? What is a scratch in the game of pool, exactly?

You’ll learn about the many types of scratches as well as the various regulations that apply to each type of scratch.

We’ll explain what a scratch is in the game of pool to you.

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  • Most likely, if you’ve ever played pool, you’ve had anything like this occur in your game. Your heart falls as the cue ball flies straight into a pocket after a misplayed stroke goes wrong. Now the game is over. The ball can be placed anywhere on the table by your opponent. .or is it possible for him to do so? If so, is it only possible to position it beneath the headstring? Or to the side of the table where the cue ball had scraped the surface of the surface? When it comes to pool, what precisely is a scratch? Your questions have been answered. In this lesson, you’ll learn about the many types of scratches and the various regulations that apply to each. It goes from scratching on the break to scratching on the 8-ball in a matter of minutes. We’ll explain what a scratch is in the game of pool to you later on. Check out our favorite billiards equipment below. View these articles for more information.

The Definition of A Scratch In Pool

A scratch is described as a cue ball that has been driven off the table or pocketed in general. For the majority of the game, these actions are regarded conventional fouls, and the opponent is awarded the ball in hand, which can be placed wherever on the table or behind the head string. However, if both the cue ball and the 8 ball are pocketed or driven off the table during a legal 8 ball shot, the game is forfeited to the opposing player, and the game is awarded to the other player. In addition, if one or more object balls are pocketed in the same stroke that leads in the cue ball being pocketed, a scratch will be incurred.

If an object ball is placed in a pocket and the cue ball comes into contact with one of the object balls, it is termed a scratch.

Definition of A Table Scratch

In pool, the term “table scratch” refers to a variety of common fouls that occur without the cue ball being pocketed or pushed off the table. Table scratches almost always result in the other player gaining possession of the ball. The fouls listed below are those that come within the table scratch umbrella.

1 Failure to Hit an Object Ball

When a player fails to strike an object ball with the cue ball, this is referred to as a table scratch. In other words, even if the cue ball hits cushions, it is still called a foul if it does not make contact with an object ball.

2 Failure To Pocket Or Contact Cushion

Another type of table scratch happens when the shooting player fails to drive the legal object ball either to a cushion or to a pocket, as is the case in this case. Consequently, if the cue ball is struck by the player and the cue ball impacts an object ball, the object ball must go to either a cushion or a pocket in order to be considered a valid shot. If the object ball performs neither of these things, it is referred to as a table scratch.

Different Rules For Scratch Fouls

Scratch infractions are subject to a wide range of rules. Even two groups of pool players at two nearby tables who are shooting pool might be playing under two separate sets of rules. Therefore, it is usually preferable to agree on common regulations before the game begins in order to ensure that all participants are operating under the same set of guidelines.

The rules outlined here are some of the most widely used, and may be found at professional tournaments, pubs, pool halls, and rec rooms all across the world, among others.

Break Scratch Rules

In the event when a player scratches during a break, there is only one common outcome to the foul. The opposing player receives the cue ball in hand behind the head string from the cue ball holder. During the interval, any object balls that were pocketed remained pocketed, and the table remained open. A scratch on a break is considered an automatic loss in certain unofficial circles, however this is not typical practice in the professional pool world or in the majority of informal regulations that have been agreed upon.

Gameplay Scratch Rules

A player pocketing the cue ball will most likely face one of two possible results as a result of the foul. The first is a ball-in-hand anyplace on the table in the first position. The opponent of the player who scratched is given the opportunity to place the ball wherever on the table and attempt a shot at the goalie. This is intended to discourage players from scratching on purpose in order to detract from their opponent’s ability to perform. In addition to shooting from anyplace behind the head string, the opposing player may also shoot from anywhere behind the head string, which is referred to as “in the kitchen” or “from the kitchen.” This implies that, regardless of whatever pocket the cue ball is pocketed in, the opposing player may only take the ball in hand from behind the head string, regardless of which pocket the cue ball is pocketed in.

  1. The head string is signified by the center markers or diamonds that are placed on each side of the table’s head string at the beginning.
  2. The cue ball must bounce off of one or more cushions at the opposite end of the table before it can legally contact an object ball in the kitchen if the shooter doesn’t have any object balls on the other side of the head string.
  3. When a scratch happens in a professional event, the regulations on how to utilize the kitchen may differ.
  4. It is necessary to shoot from behind the head string if the cue ball is pocketed at the head of the table; otherwise, it is not necessary.
  5. Whenever a player pots the cue ball in a side pocket, the opposing player has the option of putting the ball wherever on the table.

Table Scratch Rules

Table scratches are extremely rare in most areas, and the consequences are similar to those of common pocketed cue ball scratches. In order to practice two common outcomes following a table scratch, depending on the rules of the particular game, two common outcomes are practiced. The first is played with the ball in the hand behind the head string, and the second is played with the ball in the hand anywhere on the table.

The rules for both table scratches and pocket scratches should be the same, regardless of which option you choose. In addition to maintaining consistency, it also eliminates any uncertainty regarding the proper protocol in the event of a player fouling the referee.

8-Ball Scratch Rules

The scratching of the 8 ball is considered a foul in virtually every variation of 8-ball pool when firing at an object ball other than the 8 ball. After scratching on an 8 ball shot, the guilty player forfeits his or her position in the game to his or her opponent, and the game is declared a surrender. However, if the 8 ball is no longer in play, it is simply considered a defeat. Whenever a player pockets both the 8 ball and the cue ball in the same shot, that player is out of the game for that round.

The game continues if this occurs.

A ball in hand foul occurs when the cue ball is knocked off the table during an 8 ball shot.

Some rules state that a scratch on an 8-ball shot results in an immediate forfeit, regardless of whether the 8-ball is still in play or has been removed.

What is a Scratch In Pool: How The Pros Play

For many various tournaments and leagues all around the world, there are a plethora of varied regulations to follow. Both professional and amateur players in North America are reported to use the following examples, which are regarded to be the most often used in North America.

Break Scratch

A player scratches on the break, any pocketed balls stay pocketed, the offending player loses the turn, and the other player has the option to fire from anyplace below the head string if the scratch is successful. The table stays open, and the shot is confined to any object ball (except from the 8 ball) on the other side of the head string on the other side of the table.

Gameplay Scratch

Scratching is defined as pocketing the cue ball or sending it off the table with the cue ball. It is also called a scratch if the cue ball makes contact with an object ball in a full pocket while the cue ball is moving. The offending player forfeits their turn, and the opposing player is free to put and fire the cue ball from any location on the table and in any direction they choose to do so.

Table Scratch

It is called a table scratch if a player fails to hit any object ball with the cue ball while using the cue ball. This holds true for an object ball that does not make contact with either a cushion or a pocket. At least one object ball must be struck by the cue ball, and the object ball must strike either a cushion or a pocket. Whenever a player commits a table scratch, the opposing player takes over with the ball in hand and wherever on the table to continue the game.

8 Ball Scratch

In the case of an 8 ball shot, if a player scratches but fails to pocket the 8 ball, the shot is called a foul.

The ball is passed to the opposing player, who can place it wherever on the table. Should one player scratch his or her cue ball while also sinking or driving the 8-ball (or driving it off the table), then the game is forfeited and the opposite player is declared the winner.

In Conclusion

According to the examples above, there are a variety of methods to scratch when playing pool, and each one has its own set of regulations and penalties associated with it. As stated at the outset of this post, it is always a good idea to review the rules with your opponent before to playing in order to ensure that everyone is on the same page with the regulations. Taking the effort to define the rules before to playing may be a real lifesaver when dealing with people who are not used to playing by the same set of rules.

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  • It’s a lot of fun to learn how to play bank pool. Why is it necessary to chalk a pool cue? What to Do and How to Do It Correctly

Pool Rules on a Table Scratch

A scratch, according to the Billiard Congress of America, is a shot in which the cue ball is pocketed. This is considered a foul. Even if you successfully pocket an object ball, you will be scratched if the cue ball lands into any pocket and you forfeit your chance to take another turn. In addition, the rules state that if a pocket is full of balls and the cue ball comes into contact with one of the pocketed balls, it is considered a scratch. A scratch is one of the most common methods to commit a foul, and it can occur during a break or throughout the course of the game.

Break Scratch Rules

In the event that you scratch on the break, all balls that fall into a pocket will remain in that pocket. Your opponent receives the cue ball in his or her hands, sets it behind the head string, and then proceeds to take the next stroke. Head string is often denoted at one end of the table, opposite to where the rack is positioned, by a little dot or diamond atop each side rail, which indicates that the string is being used. After pocketing the eight ball on the break in eight ball, your opponent has two options: either re-break or shoot after re-spotting the eight ball behind the head string in eight ball.

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Scratch-on-the-Eight-Ball Rule

The game does not end if you scratch while attempting to pocket the eight ball and the eight ball is not pocketed. Your opponent takes the cue ball in his or her hand, sets it anyplace on the table, and then shoots it out of the table.

What Is A Scratch In Pool – Pool Rules

We’re a member of the affiliate program We hope you enjoy the things we have selected for you! Just so you’re aware, we may receive a portion of the proceeds from purchases or other forms of compensation resulting from links on this page. Thank you so much for using our links; we much appreciate it. Pool, as you might assume, is a game with a plethora of varied rules. To add to the confusion, there are a number of different regulating organizations, each with its own interpretation of the laws and regulations.

  1. As a result, what are the most frequently acknowledged guidelines for scratching?
  2. In the case of those who are not familiar with pool language, the name may appear to be a little weird.
  3. It is necessary to employ the phrase scratch in order to signal that a foul has been committed, especially on the white ball.
  4. So, what exactly is a scratch in the game of pool?

Is this the same thing as the last one? I will be answering all of these questions, as well as others that may be relevant, such as: what are the pool rules for scratch placement, scratching on the 8 ball, and scratching on the break; and what are the pool regulations for scratching on the break.

What is a scratch in pool

Let’s go right to the point: what exactly is a scratch in pool. A scratch in pool is simply when you hit the white ball with the cue ball. A foul is committed as a result of this action. However, this is not a scratch. There are other fouls in pool, such as potting your opponent’s ball, but this one is not. If you pot your ball and then the cue ball in the same shot, it is referred to as a scratch. If you bounce off a cushion and the white ball dips into the pocket, this is also considered a scrape on the surface.

  1. Scratching is defined as follows in Section 8.6 of the World Pool Association rules: when the cue ball is pocketed, the cue ball scratches.
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what happens when you scratch in pool

Let’s go right to the point: what exactly is a scratch in pool? A scratch in pool is simply when you hit the white ball with your cue ball. A foul is committed as a result of this. There are other types of fouls in pool, such as potting your opponent’s ball, although this isn’t considered a scratch per the rules. A scratch occurs when you pot your ball and then the cue ball inside the same shot. If you bounce off a cushion and the white ball dips into the pocket, this is also considered a scratch on the skin.

  1. Scratching is defined as follows in Section 8.6 of the World Pool Association rules: when the cue ball is pocketed, it is considered scratching.
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What is a Scratch in Pool – Pool table Rules – Billiards Rules for scratch

Anyone who has ever played pool has undoubtedly had an experience like this. The cue ball drops into a pocket after a shot goes badly wrong, and your heart rate begins to slow. That concludes the game, and those are the pool scratch regulations. Your opponent has complete control over where the ball is put on the court. Is the player capable of doing such an action? Is it only feasible to tuck it under the head-string in this manner? Alternatively, was it the end of the tabletop where the cue ball had scratched?

See the official pool table regulations established by the World Pool Table Association International (WPAI).

Acue ball scratching in billiards does not necessarily signify that the white ball has been defiled!

Keep in mind that not all fouls result in scratches, but not all scratches result in fouls.

Do you still have a problem understanding what I’m saying? All of these questions, as well as others such as what are the billiard rules for scratching, scratching on the break, and scratching on the eight ball, among others, will be addressed in this article. Let’s get this party started!

What is A Scratch Pool? -Rules and Regulations!

In the simplest terms, a scratch in pools happens when the white ball is thrown into the water. Because of this, a foul is committed. Infractions of a similar kind, such as potting your opponent’s ball, do exist, but this is not one of them.

  • When you have potted your ball and then the cue ball in that play, it is considered a scratch. The white ball sinks into the holes and causes you to bounce back off of the cushions, this is considered a scratch. It doesn’t matter what happens next
  • When the white ball hits the ground, it’s a scratch.

Following the World Pool Association’s (WPA) regulations of billiards, paragraph 8.6 on scratching, scratching occurs whenever the cue ball is pocketed. Consequently, fouling by other means is no longer regarded a scrape, but rather a violation of the rules.

Definition of a Table Scratch

When you hear the word “table scratch,” you’re referring to a range of typical infractions that occur without the cue ball being pocketed or pushed off the billiard top. When a table is scratched, the opponent usually obtains the ball in his or her possession. In the next section, you can find the fouls that fall under the table scratch classification.

●Failure to Pocket or Contact Cushion

A table scratch occurs when the person who strikes the ball fails to hit the authorized objective ball into a pocket or a cushion on the table. In order for a stroke to be considered genuine, the player must make contact with the cue ball, which then strikes a selected billiard ball on the table. The ball that has been aimed should next be directed to one of the cushions or pockets. When a targeted ball performs neither of these things, it is referred to as a table scratch.

●Failure to Hit an Object

In pool, a table scratch occurs whenever a player fails to strike a target ball with the cue ball. In contrast, when a cue ball hits one of the cushions but does not make contact with an object ball, it is still deemed a violation and is penalized accordingly. What Happens When You Scratch a Surface or a Surface? There are substantial differences in the rules depending on whether you are playing nine-ball or eight-ball, as well as whether or not you make a scratch on the breakaway. Once the participants have picked solids or stripes in an 8-ball or 9-ball game, the other participant (who did not make a scratch) is handed a ball in his or her hand whenever a scratch is completed.

Players have the option of placing the cue ball and then moving it till they make their move on the board.

When you’re playing in a bar with such strict rules, you’ll only be able to hit the ball a little further.

So, Why the Difference?

When a violation occurs, competitors are given a ball in hand, which allows them to position the cue ball anywhere they choose on the table.

This is why there are discrepancies in championship tournament laws in this region. In order to prevent professionals from intentionally offending with the knowledge that doing so may put their opponents in a disadvantaged position behind the head string, the law requires them to wear a uniform.

How The Professionals Play – Types of Scratch

Every country and organization on the planet has its own set of rules and laws for its events and organizations. Among both amateurs and pros in North America, the following are the most common occurrences, which are listed below.

Table Scratch

When a player misses to strike any target ball with the cue ball, this is referred to as a “table scratch.” A target ball that does not make contact with cushions or pockets is in the same condition as a regular target ball. It is necessary for the pool ball to strike at least one object ball, and for the target ball to contact either a cushion or a pocket.

Gameplay Scratch

A scratch happens if you send the cue ball flying off the table or if you pocket it while playing. It is also considered when the cue ball makes contact with the surface of the target ball when in a full pocket. The player who committed the foul forfeits their turn, and the opposing player is permitted to position and hit the cue ball from any point on the board in any method they want. a.

Break Scratch

Whenever players scrape on the breakaway, any pocketed balls remain pocketed, and the offender fails the turn, the other individual can strike from wherever he or she wants behind the head-string. In this game, the board remains open and the ball is restricted to any target ball on any of the many ends of the head string (excluding the eight ball).

8 Pall Scratch

When just the eight ball is left on the table, the following scratch penalties are applied:

  • When the cue ball is pocketed after or before the eight ball, the game is over, and the rack is won, respectively. Whenever and any way the cue ball is pocketed, but the eight ball does not drop, the opponent’s ball is in possession.

Conclusion

With the help of the World Pool Association’s pool laws, we can now comprehend what a scratch in a pool is: a foul when you pot the white ball. In addition, we’ve noticed that anytime you drop the white ball or scratch in the pool, the following occurs: Suddenly, the ball is in possession of the opposing team. Keep in mind that all of these rules are normally applicable when a player is given a set of billiard balls to play with. There are several differences in the principles that apply whether a scratch happens during a break or during ordinary play.

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What Happens If You Scratch In Pool?

*Some of the links in this post may be affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, we receive a commission on qualifying purchases made via our links. Have you ever been in the middle of a pool game when you were scratched? Perhaps they stated that they were free to do anything they wanted with the cue ball, which does not seem appropriate. In this post, we’ll go through the scratching rules for the majority popular pool games, as well as what the official regulations are. How does it affect you if you scratch in the pool?

Other versions of this rule are employed, but they should be addressed with the players prior to the start of the game.

For additional information on the various scratching rules, you will want to continue reading this article. To understand all of the official rules of 8-ball, you can also watch this instructional video.

Rules for baseball billiards

It is a game in which 21 object balls are used to play the game. The balls are labeled with numbers ranging from 1 to 21. It makes use of a cue ball that is white in color. This game was created in the year 1912. The 21 balls are stacked in a triangle-shaped piece of wood at the foot of the table, much like in other billiard games. The foot area in this game is referred to as “home plate.” During the ball racking process, the ball with the number 1 on it is placed on the home plate. The balls 2 and 3 are put to the left and right of the rack, respectively, while ball 9 is referred regarded as the pitcher in this game.

  • This game will continue until a player commits a foul, at which point the game will be over.
  • You win the game if you score the greatest number of runs.
  • Each ball is worth the amount of balls that are on the table.
  • When all nine innings have been completed, the game will come to an end.
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What happens if you scratch?

It is automatically completed when a player scratches, and the player who scratched will receive a score of zero for that particular inning. When you scratch, it will be obvious because even a single scratch can cause you to lose the game completely. If you scratch, no matter how many points you have in the inning, all of your points for that inning will be nullified, and you will receive a total of 0 points for that inning. This is one game in which you definitely don’t want to make the mistake of scratching your screen!

Rules for one pocket

Scratching occurs automatically and results in the scratching player receiving a score of zero for the inning in which the scratch occurred. When you scratch, it will be obvious since even a single scratch might cause you to lose the game entirely. If you scratch, no matter how many points you have in the inning, all of your points for that inning will be nullified, and you will receive zero points for that inning as a result. The only game you should ever scratch in is this one, so don’t even think about it.

What happens if you scratch?

If the cue ball is pocketed at the same time as the unintentionally pocketed ball, the accidentally pocketed ball to the opponent’s pocket will not be counted. Any scratch during a player’s turn will result in the player’s turn being terminated as well as a one ball penalty. This implies that if a player has three balls in his pocket and unintentionally scratches one of them, one of the balls will come out onto the table and have to be re-pocketed by the other players.

Rules for bowlliards

If the cue ball is pocketed at the same time as the unintentionally pocketed ball, the accidently pocketed ball will not be considered. Any scratch during a player’s turn will result in the player’s turn being terminated as well as a one-ball penalty being assessed.

This implies that if a player has three balls in his pocket and he accidently scratches one of them, one of the balls will come out onto the table and must be re-pocketed by the player.

What happens if you scratch?

He will need to position the cue ball beneath the head string in order to begin his second chance of the frame if the cue ball ends up as a scratch or jumps off the table during the first. His first foul on the frame will result in this penalty being applied. If this occurs more than once in a frame, the player will not be given a second opportunity, and one point will be removed from his or her final score for that frame.

Conclusion

Regardless of whether the scratch was deliberate or unintentional, the offender will always be at a disadvantage, since he will either lose a turn or have points deducted from his final score as a result of his actions. The rules for scratching varies depending on the type of pool game being played. What ever pool game you are playing, you will never want to scratch when it is your time since it might result in a loss of your position in the match.

Table Scratch – Billiard Term Definition

Welcome to the vocabulary of terminology for billiards, pool, and snooker games. In cue sports, this is the definition of Table Scratchas as they pertain to the game. You may also go through the complete pool dictionary.

Definition of Table Scratch

‘Table Scratch’ is a phrase in the game of billiards that is included in the Game Rule Terminology. Tablescratchi is a word that may be used in a number different settings in relation to cue sports. In the first instance, a table scratch refers to the shooting player failing to strike any object balls with the cue ball while shooting. Most rule sets regard the table scratch to be a foul, unless it is shot at the eight ball, in which case the game is forfeited. When an object ball is not driven to any cushion or lawful object ball by the shooting player after the cue ball has originally connected with the target object ball, this is referred to as a table scratch in this context.

Table Scratch – Usage

He’s scraped the table a total of ten times today. I’ve never seen somebody scrape their table as much as he did before.

Billiards – Table Scratch

  • Table Scratch is written by (Billiards Forum) and was published on 11/11/2008 at 7:02:18 PM.

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Submit New Billiard Term or Suggest a Correction

You can submit a new billiard phrase as well as its meaning in this section. If you’re suggesting a change to an existing term, you should enter the entire definition, including any changes you’d like to make.

Standardized Rules for 8-Ball

The General Rules of Pocket Billiards apply, with the exception of situations when these supplementary rules are obviously in conflict with each other. 1. THE MAIN OBJECT OF THE GAME Eight Ball is a call shot game in which a cue ball is used in conjunction with fifteen object balls, numbered 1 through 15, to make calls. One player must pocket balls from the group numbered 1 through 7 (solid colors), while the other player must pocket balls from the group numbered 9 through 15 (solid colors) (stripes).

  1. 2.
  2. It is not necessary to designate apparent balls and pockets when playing Call Shot.
  3. In order to avoid confusion, bank shots and combination shots should be called with care, with special attention paid to calling both the object ball and the desired pocket.
  4. Any balls pocketed as a result of a foul stay pocketed, regardless of whether the balls belong to the shooter or to the opposition.
  5. The third step is to RACK THE BALLS.
  6. 4.
  7. In the course of an individual competition, participants will swap breaking on each successive game they compete in.
  8. JUMP AND MASSE SHOT INTO THE AIR.
  9. 6th, THE LEGAL BREAK SHOT (Defined) When attempting a legal break, the breaker (with the cue ball behind the headstring) must either (1) pocket a ball or (2) drive at least four numbered balls to the rail before the break is considered successful.
  10. 7.

It is important to note that an incoming opponent who has a cue ball in his hand behind the head string is not permitted to shoot an object ball that is behind the head string until the cue ball has passed the headstring and caused the cue ball to return behind the headstring and hit the object ball.

  1. It is a foul if a player jumps an object ball off the table during a break shot.
  2. 9.
  3. If the breaker scratches while pocketing the 8-ball on the break, the incoming player has the choice of a re-rack or having the 8-ball spotted and beginning shooting with the ball in hand behind the headstring, depending on the circumstances.
  4. OPEN THE TABLE.
  5. Please keep in mind that the table is always open immediately following the break shot.
  6. When the table is open and the 8-ball is the first ball to be touched, however, no stripe or solid may be scored in the shooter’s favor if the table is open.
  7. On an open table, all unlawfully pocketed balls stay pocketed, even if the table is closed.

SELECTION OF PARTICIPANTS Even if balls are created from either one or both groups, the decision between stripes and solids is not established until after the break has occurred.

Only when a player legally pockets a called object ball following the break shot does the decision of group become clear to the other players.

THE LEGAL SHOOT (Defined) The shooter must strike one of his group of balls first on all shots (except on the break and while the table is open) in order to (1) pocket a numbered ball or (2) cause the cue ball or any numbered ball to contact a rail.

Failure to comply with these standards is considered a misdemeanor.

“SAFETY” CAMERA SHOT An experienced player may decide to pocket an evident object ball and also cease his turn at the table by informing the other players that he has declared “safety” in advance.

If the shooting player intends to play it safe by pocketing an evident object ball, he must notify his opponent of this intention prior to taking the shot.

During a safety shot, any ball that has been pocketed remains pocketed.

THE SCORING PROCESS.

Following the lawful pocketing of all of the balls in a player’s set of balls, the player will attempt to pocket the 8-ball.

PENALTY FOR FOUL.

This means that the player has complete freedom to place the cue ball wherever he or she wants on the table (does not have to be behind the headstring except on opening break).

When a player has “cue ball in hand,” he or she may place the cue ball using his or her hand or any portion of his or her cue (even the tip).

(See also Rule 39 of the General Rules of Pocket Billiards for further information.) COMBINATION PHOTOGRAPHS 16.

BALLS THAT HAVE BEEN ILLEGALLY POCKETED The illegal pocketing of an object ball occurs when (1) the object ball is pocketed on the same shot that a foul is committed, (2) the called ball does not go into the specified pocket, or (3) a safety is called before the shot occurs, all of which occur on the same shot.

  • 18.
  • If any object ball is jumped off the table, it is considered a foul and results in a loss of turn, unless it is the 8-ball, in which case it results in a loss of the whole game.
  • THE ART OF PLAYING THE 8-BALL.
  • The cue ball is in the hand of the incoming player.
  • 20.
  • If a player commits any of the following offences, he will be eliminated from the game: a.
  • b.
  • d.
  • When the 8-ball is placed in a pocket other than the one assigned, the player is considered to be cheating.
  • It is important to note that all offenses must be called before another shot may be attempted, or else it will be determined that no infraction happened.

If, after each player has taken three consecutive turns at the table (for a total of six turns), the referee determines (or, in the absence of a referee, both players agree) that attempting to pocket or move an object ball will result in the loss of the game, the balls will be re-racked, with the original breaker of the stalemated game breaking once more.

PLEASE NOTE: A player does not lose the game if he or she commits three consecutive fouls in a row. Return to the Billiards, Snooker, and Pool page. Rules, regulations, and more. Return to Sjoerd’s Personal Homepage

Billiards Rules

Individual Sport Rules for Billiards

  1. In order to avoid a forfeit, players must be to the table no later than 5 minutes after the start time of the match. A match is made up of the best two games out of three that are played. (Women will only participate in one game.) All games will be conducted in accordance with the 8-ball regulations detailed below. During that period, any disagreements must be resolved at the table. The game has been going on for more than 50 minutes beyond the official start time. The player who has won the most games or has pocketed the most balls in the current game is considered the winner.

8 Ball is a number that represents the number of balls in a row. 1. THE MAIN OBJECT OF THE GAME Eight Ball is a call shot in which a cue ball and fifteen object balls, numbered 1 through 15, are used to play the game. One player must pocket balls from the group numbered 1 through 7 (solid colors), while the other player must pocket balls from the group numbered 9 through 15. (stripes). In this game, the player who pockets his group first and then legally pockets the 8-BALL is the winner. 2. PHONE CALL SHOT.

  1. If the opponent is doubtful about the shot, he has the right to inquire as to which ball and pocket will be used.
  2. In order to call the shot, it is NEVER essential to provide specifics such as the number of cushions or banks, kisses, caroms, or other such items.
  3. 3.
  4. A break is an option available to the winner of a lag or a coin flip.
  5. Jumping balls and masseshooting will not be permitted on the premises.
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Failure to make a valid break results in a foul, and the incoming player has two options: (1) accepting the table in its current position and shooting, or (2) having the balls re-racked and having the choice of shooting his own opening break or allowingthe offending player to make another break.

GET A LEGAL BREAK FROM YOUR JOB.

PLEASE BE AWARE OF THE FOLLOWING: The incoming player has the cue ball in his hand behind the head string and is not permitted to shoot an object ball that is behind the head string unless he first shoots the cue ball past the head string, causing the cue ball to come back behind the head string and hit the object ball, which is then permitted.

  • OBJECT BALLS WERE THROWN OFF THE TABLE DURING THE BREAK In the event when a player hops an object ball off the table during a breakshot, the player is called for a foul and the ball is spotted.
  • 8.
  • If the 8-ball is pocketed on the break, the breaker may ask for an are-rack or may have the 8-ball sighted and continue shooting with the remaining balls.
  • A “calledshot” is not used to refer to the OPENING BREAK.
  • TEN.
  • Whenever the choice of groups (stripes or solids) has not yet been made, the table is considered to be “open.” The practice of hitting a solid first to make a stripe or vice versa is permitted while the table is open.
  • The act of hitting any solid or stripe or the 8-ball first in the process of pocketing a called stripe or solid is permitted when the table is open when the table is open.

Shooter’s turn is forfeited; any balls pocketed stay pocketed; and the balls are addressed by the incoming player while the table is still in play.

11.

After the break shot, the table is always open and ready for business.

12.

13.

Failure to comply with these standards is considered a misdemeanor.

THE SCORING PROCESS.

An opponent attempts to pocket the 8-ball after a player has successfully pocketed his whole set of balls.

16.

The cue ballin hand is given to the opposing player.

It is against the rules for a player to commit malicious fouls that would place his opponent at a competitive disadvantage.

When the cueball is in place, any forward stroke action that makes contact with the cue ball will be considered a foul shot, if not a legal one.

PHOTOS OF COMBINATIONS However, until the table is open, the 8-ball may not be used as the first ball in a combination shot unless the table is already open.

BALLS THAT HAVE BEEN ILLEGALLY POCKETED The unlawful pocketing of an object ball occurs when either (1) the object ball is pocketed on the same shot that a foul is committed or (2) the called ball does not go into the allocated pocket on the designated shot.

19.

Afoul and loss of turn are incurred if any object ball is leapt off the table, with the exception of the 8-ball, which results in a loss of game.

20.

If a player commits any of the following offenses, he or she forfeits the game: * When pocketing the 8-ball, there are fouls (exception: see 8-Ball Pocketed on The Break).

* Can be used to remove the 8-ball from the table at any moment.

It pocketed the 8-ball even though it was not the lawful objectball and scratched the 8-ball during the effort to manufacture the 8-ball, among other things. Points awarded by the IMA See the Handbook for further information.

Cutthroat (pool) – Wikipedia

Known also as three-man screw, cutthroatorcut-throat, or three-man screwball, is a pool game played on a pool table with a full standard set of pool balls (including 15 numbered object balls and an acue ball); the game cannot be played with three or more players using an unnumbered reds-and-yellows ball set, such as that used in blackball. Each participant is often issued a set of five object balls with sequential numbers, however the number of balls assigned will vary depending on the number of players.

Besides pool, the term “cutthroat” is also used to apply to various games played with three or more people in which all players must fend for themselves, such as cutthroatbridge and cutthroatAmerican handball, among other things.

Gameplay

For cutthroat pool, the 1 ball is put on the foot location of the billiards rack while the 6 ball and 11 ball are placed on the other two corners of the billiards rack, as shown below. There are (typically) three sets of balls in a game of cutthroat. Balls 1–5 are referred to as “low” balls, whereas balls 6–10 are referred to as “mid” balls, and balls 11–15 are referred to as “high” balls. After a while, each of the three participants will “possess” one of the sets of five balls that have been distributed.

  1. The decision on whether or not each shot must be called is made prior to the game.
  2. For example, if the breaking player pockets the 6 and then the 9, that player clearly does not own the 6–10 group, but that player does not yet clearly hold either the 1–5 or the 11–15 groups.
  3. Consequently, a foul break carries the risk that the fouling breaker will be assigned to a group from which a ball was pocketed on the foul break shot at some point in the future.
  4. When a player lawfully pockets one or more object balls with each shot, his turn continues until the player’s turn expires.
  5. “Cutting one’s own neck” is the term used to describe this situation.

Fouls

Ascratch (knocking the cue ball into a pocket or off the table) is subject to particular penalties, which are discussed further below, and results in the approaching player obtaining the cue ball in his or her possession. It is necessary to follow the general rules of pocket billiards, which include common fouls such as striking the cue ball twice on the same shot, striking an object ball with the cue stick instead of the cue ball, knocking an object ball off the table, and so on. Such fouls result in the shooter’s turn being terminated without additional punishment.

If a player pockets his or her opponent’s ball while committing a foul, the opponent has the option of raising the ball from the pocket and placing it back on the table for play. This is accomplished by placing the elevated ball on the foot area.

Winning

Being the last player standing with at least one object ball on the table is the goal. When a player has no balls on the table, he or she is referred to as “out” (eliminated), and his or her turn in the player rotation is passed over. It is possible to be “out” for a short period of time under conventional rules (in which balls are recovered from the scratch – see below).

Spotting

Scratching (knocking the cue ball into a pocket or off the table) has the consequence that all of the shooter’s opponents are rewarded by taking one of their balls (if any have been pocketed) out of a pocket andspottingit (placing the next shooting player’s ball in front of the other shooting player’s ball) back onto the table. As a result, when any then-surviving player scratches, a player who has been “out” returns to the game with one of their balls back in play, and so on. However, if a scratch happens after a player has pocketed an opponent’s ball on the same move, just one ball is returned to the table for each opponent, as the punishment is not meant to negate the effects of the scratch, but rather to penalize the offender while rewarding the other players equally.

Unless the last shot was made illegally, the shooting player continues to engage in the action.

Variations

It is a frequent variant whereby the first shooter to legally pocket a ball without fouling (committing an error) gets to claim any set that he wants as his own property. If the breakshooter pockets any ball (without fouling), he has the option to claim any set and continue shooting from that point. The next shooter to legally pocket a ball during his turn earns the right to claim possession of one of the two remaining sets of ten basketballs. In the event of a foul break, the first successive shooter to legally pocket a ball is awarded any set, and the next shooter to legally pocket a ball is awarded one of the remaining sets, as explained above.

Alternative scratch and spotting rules

Each of the fouling player’s opponents who was still playing in the game at the time of the foul may return one of their pocketed balls to the table if the cue ball is scratched by the fouling player. Players who were already “out” prior to the shot continue to be “out.” Alternatively, if the shooter pockets both his or her own final objective balls (i.e., all balls are down except for the cue ball), then only a player who was still alive prior to that last shot (typically the shooter and his or her final opponent) will be able to spot a ball; eliminated players will not be allowed to return to the game in this version.

The same assailant continues to fire.

Another modification (independent of the spotting rule mentioned above) that is popular in North America is that the incoming player after a scratch receives the cue ball in-hand behind the head string (baulk line) exclusively, rather than in-hand anywhere else on the table, following the scratch.

More players

When playing as a team, players can be divided into pairs (or more) for each of the three sets of balls, and they can alternate turns or (in the case of the Scotch doubles format) shoot alternate shots during their turn. In most cases, the game can also be played by five players (or teams), with each player having three balls rather than the traditional five. Ball sets with smaller and more numerous balls as well as a special rack for them have also been produced in order to accommodate a greater number of participants.

Because some combinations would result in all of the players not having the same number of balls, it is necessary to remove one or more balls from the rack from time to time.

  • Two players, each with seven balls
  • Three players, each with five balls
  • Four or five players each receive three balls
  • Six or seven players each receive two balls
  • Eight to fifteen players, each with a ball

Eagle Pool Balls makes a ball set that uses colored groups of balls rather than numbered groups of balls, which may be used to play three- to five-player cutthroat pool. In this game, there are several different types of racks that are used: a standard triangle rack with three groups of five balls each for three players; a custom, large diamond rack with eight groups of eight balls each for four players; and a standard triangle rack with five groups of three balls each for five players.

Multi-game scoring

Instead of playing a single game, several point systems can be employed to play matches or sets of games. Because of the game’s peculiarity as a three-player game, it is possible to count the number of games won, but it does not offer credit for finishing second. According to one method, the winner gets three points for a win plus an additional one point for each of the winner’s remaining balls at the conclusion of each game. The person who was last eliminated earns two points, while the one who was first eliminated receives none.

As the battle progresses, this system stresses strategy in terms of who to remove first, frequently resulting in the formation of alliances between the two trailing players in order to catch the leader in points.

Coin-operated table play

A player who scratches picks one of his or her own balls to be pocketed immediately, in lieu of opponents’ balls returning to the table, when the game is played on coin-operated tables (in which balls cannot be returned to play at will once pocketed, only after paying for another game). It is permissible for an opponent to pick a ball belonging to the offender which is to be removed if a scratch happens on the same shot that an opponent’s ball has been pocketed.

This is in contrast to a scratch occurring on the same shot that an opponent’s ball has been pocketed. In any situation, the scratching player may find himself or herself “out.”

References

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