How to Play Crazy Eights Card Game – Rules & Strategies –

How to Play Crazy Eights Card Game – Rules & Strategies –

What is it about a deck of cards that appeals to you? What is it about them that makes them so appealing? Is it the tactile quality of their products? Or perhaps it’s the sound of them being shuffled that’s disturbing you. Perhaps it is the simple fact that there is so much that can be done with them to provide us with entertainment. Whatever it is, we humans are completely smitten with playing cards and card games. As a result, we’d like to demonstrate how to play Crazy Eights, a card game, today.

This game is enjoyed by both children and adults.

How to Play Crazy Eights

The winner of Crazy Eights is chosen by the player who can discard all of his or her cards the quickest. If you are able to accomplish this, you may lift your arms in a triumph pump. Once again, the game is won by the individual who discards all of their cards first. It appears to be simple, doesn’t it? It is yet it isn’t at the same time. Its difficulty resides in the limited window of opportunity where skill may be applied to the game. Aside than that, it is a game of luck.

Crazy Eights Setup

You’ll need to purchase a conventional 52-card deck of playing cards and shuffle it thoroughly before you begin. Depending on the number of people present, you will need to deal the cards in the following ways:

  • A deck of cards is dealt to each participant in a two-person game
  • Each player receives seven cards. In a game if there are three or more participants, each player should be dealt a hand of five cards. If you choose, you may even play a four-player game as a team if you so desire. This does, however, bring an additional level of enjoyment to the game. Players will take their turns in the following order: starting with the player to the left of the dealer, and working their way clockwise.

Crazy Eights Rules

  • Make a deal with the cards
  • Place the remainder of the card stack face down on the table. This is your draw pile, by the way. The dealer deals the first card from the draw pile to the table. This is put next to the pile to serve as the starting point for the discard pile Each card dealt from a player’s hand must be identical to the card facing up on the discard pile in order for the player to win. It can match either, but not both
  • Therefore, it cannot match both. If Player One is able to do so, they will play a card from their hand. The players must draw a card from the draw pile if they do not have a matching card in their hand. If the card is a match, they may put it on the discard pile
  • Otherwise, they may not. If the card does not match, the player keeps it in their hand as a part of their collection. Once a match is created, the player must continue to draw cards until a match is made. As soon as a match is established, the following player takes his or her turn
  • Eights are wild cards, and as a result, when they are played, the player must indicate whether or not they are changing the suit. The phrase “Last card” must be spoken by a player when he or she is down to their last card in front of the other player or players. If they fail to do so, they will be punished by being forced to draw two more cards on their subsequent turn. After all of the cards have been discarded, the player is declared the winner.

How to Play Crazy Eights – An Illustration In this example, there are two participants in the game. The cards have been dealt, and the first card has been flipped over to the left. It is the nine of clubs that has been dealt. Player One makes a card discard and places it on the Nine. It is a pair of clubs that has been dealt. Player two gets their turn, but they do not have a two or a club in their hand. They choose three diamonds from a hat and place them on the table. It is placed in their existing hand, and they are then dealt another card to complete the deck.

  • Assuming that player one has an eight, he or she sets it on the card and says, “Spades.” In the second round, player two draws from the pile and receives an Ace of Spades.
  • Players one and two each take their turn, but player two discovers that he or she is not obtaining a match and has so received an additional 10 cards.
  • Round two gets underway almost immediately, and so forth.
  • Check out our How to Play Spades Guide for more information!

A Recap

Crazy Eights: An Example of How to Play Two players are involved in this case. Cards have been dealt; the first card is flipped over to reveal the second card. The nine of clubs is the card to be dealt. In order to play the Nine, Player One must discard a card. Two of clubs have been dealt. Player two takes their turn, but he or she does not have a two or a club in their hand at the moment. It is the three of diamonds that they pull from the pile. It is placed in their existing hand, and they are then dealt another card to complete the deck of cards.

Assuming that player one has an eight, he or she sets it on the card and says, “Spades.

The card is shuffled into the discard pile and put at the top of the stack.

Eventually, a match is established, but Player One is down to his final card and declares, “Last card.” Player One becomes victorious from the game’s early stages.

And so it goes on for the rest of the day in Round 2. Interested in discovering new card games? Look no further. Consider checking out our Spades Playing Instructions.

Strategy

Crazy Eights is mostly a game of chance, but there is still a role for strategy in this game. Given the inability of players to forecast what cards they will require or what cards will be drawn, the only meaningful strategy is determining when to employ a crazy eight in an unsuccessful attempt to change the game in their favor. Example: If you are holding three cards of the same suit and want to switch to the suit in which you have those three cards, you might use the eight to switch to the suit you have those three cards in.

The Winner

This game is won by the person who discards their final card into the discard pile. We hope you have as much fun playing this game as we have had creating it.

Crazy Eights – Card Game Rules

Eights are considered wild in this classic game.

The Pack

The normal 52-card deck is used for this game.

Object of the Game

The objective of the game is to be the first player to discard all of the cards in your hand.

Card Values/Scoring

The winner of the game is the one who is the first to run out of cards. According to the rules of this game, the winning player takes from each other player the value of the cards that are still in that player’s hand. Each of the eight equals 50 points. Each K, Q, J, or 10 equals a total of ten points. Each ace is worth one point. Each of the other cards represents a pip value.

The Deal

Deal 5 cards one at a time, face down, starting with the person on the left and working your way up. The remaining contents of the pack are placed face down in the center of the table, forming the stock of the company. The dealer removes the top card from the deck and sets it in a separate pile; this card is referred to as the “starter.” If an eight is turned, it is buried in the middle of the pack, and the following card is turned to reveal the remaining cards. The Actors in the Play Each player must place one card face up on the initial pile, beginning with the person to their left of the dealer.

  1. As an illustration, if the Q of Clubs is the starting card, any club or any Queen may be played on it.
  2. If the player is unable to play when the stock is depleted, he or she must pass.
  3. All of the eights are out of control!
  4. The next player must choose between playing a card from the selected suit or an eight as their first card.

@OfficialBicycleCards on Instagram

People of all ages may enjoy card games such as Crazy Eights since they are portable and easy to play. Playing cards may be used to assist adults and children develop their fine and gross motor abilities, as well as their coordination.

Particularly, shuffling and dealing can aid in the quickening of reflexes. Card games allow an opportunity to communicate with individuals in a more personal setting while also engaging in a little friendly rivalry with the other players.

The Story Of Crazy Eights

Eights was the name of the game when it originally emerged in the 1930s. When troops from the United States military were dismissed because they were mentally ill in the 1940s, they were placed in Section 8 housing, which became known as Crazy Eights.

Crazy Eights

There are other varieties of the game, including Craits, Last One, Pesten, Rockaway, Swedish Rummy, Last Card, Screw Your Neighbor, and Uno. Craits is a variation of the game that originated in Sweden. Crazy eights is a card game similar to shedding that may be played by two to seven players. A pre-extension of Switch and Mau Mau, the game is regarded a prequel to both games. When there are five or less participants, a conventional 52-card deck is used, which does not include any jokers. With five or more people, two decks can be mixed together to ensure that everyone has sufficient cards to play with.

BasicPlay

Each player receives a hand of eight cards (or seven in a two player game). The remaining cards are shuffled and placed face down in the middle of the table. The top card is then flipped face up to signal the beginning of the game’s first round. To gain a playable card, players must discard cards of the same rank or suit or draw cards from the stockpile until they get one. When a player plays an 8, he or she must declare the suit that the next player will play. The following player must either play the suit that was declared or play another eight.

The cards are collected from each opponent and the point scores of the cards remaining in that opponent’s hand are calculated by the individuals involved.

  • Eight is for 50 points
  • A king, queen, or ten is worth ten points
  • An ace is worth one point
  • And the other card is worth its face value.

If there are no more cards in the deck after all of them have been dealt, the player who has the lowest point total in their hands wins the difference between that total and each opponent’s total. The game is won by the player who is the first to reach a certain number of points in the allotted time. Two players receive 100 points, three players receive 150 points, four players receive 200 points, five players receive 250 points, six players receive 300 points, and seven players receive 350 points.

Wild Cards

4’s and Jack’s are out of the game (but 4’s can also flip the order). The queen of spades draws five cards from the deck. The 2’s are the second card from the deck. When they are stacked or paired with other 2’s, they add to the total, which you then take possession of. For example, three 2’s equals a total of 6 cards drawn from the deck in this scenario. Additionally, when the 2 of spades is placed on top of the queen of spades, it results in a pickup 7 for the player who comes next.

I Crazy 8’s, 8’s are wild and may be used to change the suit of any card set down before them, regardless of the preceding card laid down. In the case of the Queen of Clubs, for example, she is laid down. Next, the player can place the 8 of diamonds on the table and convert the suit to hearts.

The Deal

Deal cards one at a time, face down, starting with the players to the left of the dealer and working your way clockwise. According to the number of participants, there will be a total of x cards dealt. The remainder of the pack is placed face down in the center of the table, where it will serve as the stockpile for the game. Unless an 8, the dealer flips the top card and sets it in a separate pile from the rest of the cards. After then, the 8 would be buried in the middle of the hoard, and the next card would be revealed.

Playing Crazy Eights

Each player must place one card face up on the initial pile, beginning with the person to their left of the dealer. Unless it is an 8, each card played must be a duplicate of the card showing on the initial pile, either in suit or denomination. After being unable to play, cards are chosen from the stockpile’s top, and so on until a play is available, or until the stockpile is depleted entirely. A version of the game in which the stockpile runs out removes the top card from the face-up pile and allows the cards to be reshuffled is called “stockpile removal.” Even if a player has a playable card in his or her hand, he or she may draw from the stock to complete the round.

That is, an 8 may be played at any moment throughout a turn, and the player merely has to designate the suit in which it should be played.

Allow your creativity to run free!

The Zimbabwean variant contains a plethora of suggestions.

The Zimbabwean Variation Of Crazy Eights

This version of crazy eights is more difficult, but it is also more dynamic. It has a slightly different set of rules, and it is more similar to the game of Uno than the traditional version of crazy eights. Each player is handed five to eight cards from the deck, with the remaining cards of the deck being put face down in the center of the table to begin the game. The top card is then flipped face up to signal the beginning of the game’s first round. Unless a player can match the rank or suit of the top card of the discard pile and does not have a special functions card, or unless they simply do not choose to play any of the cards in their hand, they must draw one card from the stockpile to complete their hand.

Players have the option of playing more than one game of the same number at the same time.

Special Function Cards

There are various unique cards that may be used to change the course of the game, whether as defensive or attacking cards.

Offensive Cards

These allow the user to modify the ability of the next player to participate in the game.

Seven: Skip The Next Player

Each time a player uses a 7, they “skip” over the player who follows them in the rotation. Similarly, if the following player also has a 7, and they play it before the player after them places a card, they are able to negate the “skip” effect and move it to the player after them.

The use of a “skip” allows a player to play again in a game of two players, and it may be used in conjunction with kings and jacks to create a continuous run of play. A 7 card can be played if the rank or suit allowances of the top card of the discard pile match the allowances of the 7 card.

Eight: Declare A Suit

Whenever a player plays an 8, he or she must indicate the suit that will be played by the following player. The player must next follow the suit that was named or play another eight. If an 8 is played as a straight counter to a declaring 8, then the game will proceed in the manner of the freshly played 8 until the game is completed. During a player’s turn, an 8 card can be played regardless of the suit or rank of the previous card. AN 8 card cannot be placed on top of another by the same player during their turn; instead, they may only be played one at a time by the same player.

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Jack:Reverse Order

When a player makes advantage of a jack, the play rotation is reversed, letting the player who came before him or her to play once again. The player who receives the jack has the option of determining whether the reversal will last for the duration of the game until another jack is dealt or if it will last only until the preceding player has dealt. Using the latter method, the jack player is able to play once more. The use of a “reverse” in a game of two players allows one of the players to play again, and it may be paired with sevens and kings to provide uninterrupted play.

Two: Opponent Picks Up Two Cards

A two-card hand can only be played if the card that was just played was a joker. In order for the next player to be able to play after picking up the two cards, the player who has just played the two cards must state, “choose two, no pick and play.” A 2 is played, and the following rotation member must either block with a defensive card or play their own offensive. If the total number of cards requested has been increasing over time, the next rotation member must pick up two or more additional cards from the deck or discard two cards from their hand.

J oker: Opponent Picks Up Five Cards

During a player’s turn, a joker can be played regardless of the suit or score of the previous played card on the discard pile, as long as it is not a joker. Whenever a joker is played, the following player in the rotation must either block the joker with a defensive card or play their own offensive card, or choose five cards from the deck or more if the total number of cards requested has been increasing over time.

Defensive Cards

Defensive cards shield the player from the effects of offensive cards played against them by the player who came before them. For example, when a player is selecting many cards as a consequence of an offensive card played by a previous player, if the first card a player takes from the deck is defensive (an ace), they will not be required to pick the other cards that they would have otherwise had to pick.

If an ace appears in consecutive selections, it cannot be played, and the player is forced to forfeit a turn as is customary in this situation.

Ace: Place Down Any Of The Same Suits You Have As TheAce

Similarly to other versions, if a player runs out of cards in his or her deck, the top card of the discard pile is left face up, and the rest of the discard pile cards are reshuffled and used as the new deck, similar to other variations. The game finishes as soon as one of the players has used up all of the cards in their hand by drawing a standard card. Not if the card that came before it in the pile was an offensive or defensive card, on the other hand. If a player empties their hand under these circumstances, or if a special function card is used, the player is considered to be “in-air.” This means that during their next turn, they must choose one card from the deck and proceed with the game.

The round is decided by the player who has accrued the most number of cumulative score points.

If more than one player has the same highest score at the conclusion of a round, each player must select one additional card from the deck until there is a clear loser of the round.

Lucky Card

If a player in the following rotation holds an offensive card or a high cumulative value after a series of 2’s and jokers, the player might request a Lucky Card before selecting the number of prescribed cards. This is the first card to be dealt from the top of the deck to the bottom. It is an Ace, and it is a blocking card, which means it may be used to prevent the penalty from being assessed. Additionally, as an offensive joker or deuce (2), the card can be used to increase the value of the cumulative penalty, which is then passed on to the following player in the rotation.

Card games, such as Crazy Eights, do not need much more than a deck of cards and a flat surface to be played, making them accessible to players practically everywhere. Some card games need a significant amount of strategy, as well as a thorough grasp of statistics and probability theory.

How Do You Play Crazy Eights? – How Do You Play It

Crazy Eights Rules: An overview of the game Crazy Eights: Crazy Eights is a very popular card game that may be played by people of all ages and abilities. The game may be played by any number of people between two to eight people, and while having more people playing the game might increase the interest and excitement, it also results in a shorter game span for many of the players, simply because there are less cards accessible for each of them. However, if you are looking for a good time to bring people together, there is nothing better than a deck of cards, and Crazy Eights is a game that does all you could possibly want it to.

  • If, on the other hand, you intend to play with six or more people, you will need to combine two distinct decks of cards.
  • There is an introduction dealer present at the start of the game.
  • When the cards are dealt, the individual dealing them offers one card to each player one at a time, and the one who receives the first ace becomes the official first dealer (of course, you can always make it the first person who lands a king or any other card, but in general, it is an ace).
  • Once they have finished shuffling, they should set the deck next to the player on their right, who will then cut the cards from the deck.
  • The number of cards dealt to each participant will be seven if you are playing with only two people.
  • If you don’t want to deal with the remaining cards from the deck, you can set them face down in the center of the table.
  • The “Starter” is a term used to describe this.

Crazy Eights Gameplay Requirements include: The goal of the game is to be the first player to get rid of all of your cards as quickly as possible.

This implies that if there is a king of hearts visible, the player must choose between placing in a king or placing in a heart.

When a player does not have a card, he or she must continue to draw from the center of the deck until they do so.

If this happens to you, merely pass and continue playing as if it were your turn, at which point you will have a valid play on your hands.

No matter what card is now in your hand, if you have an eight, you can play it at any moment regardless of what card is currently in your hand.

The person that wins is the one who accumulates the total score of all of the cards that the other players have.

Face cards and tens are worth ten points each, while an ace is worth one point and number cards are worth the number printed on the card itself.

You can choose what point value total wins the final game (for example, 500 points), but whomever achieves the final point total at the conclusion of the game will be declared the winner of the entire game of Crazy Eights. This is an excellent card game for everyone who like playing with cards.

Crazy Eights – Wikipedia

Crazy 8’s

In Crazy Eights, playing an 8 card will change the current suit of the game.
Type Shedding
Players 2+
Skills required Tacticsand communication
Cards 52 (Originally 28)
Deck French
Play Clockwise and counter-clockwise
Playing time Various
Random chance Medium
Related games
Mau Mau,Uno

Crazy Eights is a card game in the style of shedding that may be played by two to seven players. The goal of the game is to be the first person to completely discard all of their cards from their hand. The game is similar toSwitch and Mau Mau in terms of gameplay. Originally, this game was played largely by youngsters, using the leftover cards from the game of Euchre as playing cards. A normal 52-card deck is now used when there are five or fewer competitors in a tournament. There are 104 cards in total when there are more than five players, therefore two decks are combined and all 104 cards are played.

Origins

The game first appeared in the 1930s under the name Eights, and the name Crazy Eights was coined in the 1940s to refer to the United Statesmilitary designation for the discharge of mentally ill soldiers, Section 8. Crazy Eights is derived from the United Statesmilitary designation for the discharge of mentally ill soldiers, Section 8. It’s possible that it came from the German game of Mau-Mau. There are other versions of the fundamental game, which are known by various names such as Craits, Last Card, Switch, and Black Jack.

Players may readily design and explore new rules, according to author David Parlett, who sees Crazy Eights as “less a game and more a fundamental pattern of play on which a vast range of alterations might be rung.”

Basic play

Each player is dealt a hand of five cards (or seven in a two-player game). The stock pile is made up of the remaining cards in the deck, which are laid face down in the center of the table. The top card is then flipped face up to serve as the first card in the discard pile, which serves as the starting point for the game. Players discard by matching the top card of the discard pile with the card on their left, starting with the person to their left of the dealer. Alternatively, they can choose to play any 8 at any moment, which allows them to indicate the suit that the next player will play; the following player must then either follow the designated suit or play another 8.

Whenever a player is unable to play because the stock pile has been depleted, that player must pass the turn to the person to his or her left.

A player may draw from the stock pile at any moment, even if he or she currently has one or more playable cards in their possession.

  1. Can play 6, 6, or 6
  2. Can play any club
  3. Can play any 8 (then must declare a suit)
  4. Can draw from the stockpile and continue their turn

If the stock pile runs out of cards, all played cards are reshuffled to produce a new stock, with the exception of the top card. The game is over as soon as one of the players has used up all of their cards. A payment from each opponent equal to the point score of the cards remaining in that opponent’s hand is collected by that player on their behalf. 8s are for 50 points, court cards are worth 10 points, and all other cards are worth their face value. If there are no more cards in the deck after all of them have been dealt, the player who has the lowest point total in their hands wins the difference between that total and each opponent’s total.

The game is won by the player who is the first to reach a certain number of points in the allotted time.

Two players receive 100 points, three players receive 150 points, four players receive 200 points, five players receive 250 points, six players receive 300 points, and seven players receive 350 points.

Variations

Crazy Eights, according to card game historian John McLeod, is “one of the easiest games to change by adding variants,” and there are several variant rules available. The following are examples of rules that are frequently applied to cards: Queens do not participate. When a Queen is played, the following player will be unable to take their turn. Aces change the direction of the game. When you play an Ace, the game’s direction is reversed. Draw No. 2 When a player plays a two, the following player is forced to draw two cards unless they can play another two.

In the United States, one of the most popular variations of the game is Crazy Eights Countdown, in which players begin with a score of 8.

(For example, initially, all players are dealt eight cards, with 8s acting as wild cards for everyone; after one round, one person will be handed seven cards, with 7s acting as wild cards for them, but 8s acting as wild cards for the rest of the players.) The game is won by the person who is the first to lower their score to zero.

See also

  • The card games Uno, Switch, Mau Mau, Macau, Taki, and Craits are some of the more popular options.

References

  1. The Oxford Dictionary of Card Games is a work by David Parlett published in 1996. Oxford University Press is a publishing house based in Oxford, England. ISBN 0-19-869173-4, page 291. Don Rauf’s Simple Rules for Card Games: Instructions and Strategy for Twenty Card Games was published in 2013. (1st ed.). Potter Style in New York City. ISBN 978-0-7704-3385-7 on page 25
  2. Rome, Ben H., and Hussey, Chris (2013). Games’ most wanted: the top 10 book of players, pawns, and power-ups. New York, NY: Routledge (1st ed.). University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 978-1-59797-723-4
  3. University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 978-1-59797-723-4
  4. “Crazy Eights – Card Game Rules”.
  5. Abcdefg”Crazy Eights – Card Game Rules”.
  6. Crazy Eights,” Bicycle, 2020, text=That percent 20is percent 2C percentage of a percentage of a percentage of a percentage of a percentage of a percent 20number, (but percent 20is never a percentage of a percentage of a number)
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Crazy Eights – Card Game Rules

  • Fundamentals of the game, special cards, variations, Crazy Eights Countdown, other variations, Crazy Eights software, and internet games are all covered.

Introduction and Alternative Names

Crazy Eights is a card game for two or more players in which the goal is to get rid of the cards in your hand onto a discard pile by matching the number or suit of the cards that were discarded before your turn. There are a plethora of different varieties of this game, as well as several alternate names. Crates, Switch, Swedish Rummy, Last One, and Rockaway are all names for this game. Tschausepp is the name of the game in Switzerland, whilePesten is the name of the game in the Netherlands. A common nickname among British players for this card game is “Black Jack,” which is problematic since it might cause confusion with the well-known American banking card game of the same name.

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Basic Game

The basic game of Crazy Eights is played using a conventional 52-card deck, or two 52-card packs that have been mixed together if there are a large number of participants. Each player receives five cards from the dealer, which is a one-time deal (seven each if there are only two players). The remainder of the pack is put face down on the table and will serve as a stock from which cards will be picked in the next rounds. As soon as the top card of the stock is flipped face up, it is put alongside it in order to begin the discard pile.

The following performances are permitted.

  1. As long as the top card of your discard pile does not include an Eight, you may play any card from your hand that matches either the rank or the suit of the previous card (for example, the king of hearts, if the previous card was the king of hearts, you might play any other king or any heart). An Eight may be played on any card, and the player of the Eight must specify which suit he or she want to play on. You must play either another Eight or a card from the suit specified by the person who originally played the Eight if an Eight is positioned at the top of the pile.

If an Eight is turned up by the dealer as the first card in the play pile, it is handled as if the dealer had played the card instead of drawing it. The dealer examines his or her hand and chooses a suit, and the first player must then play a card from that suit or another Eight to begin the game. When a player has just one card remaining in his or her hand, he or she must notify the other players by stating “final card.” In the event that a player fails to do so before the next player begins their turn, that player will be forced to draw two cards from the top of the stock as a punishment.

If the stock pile is depleted, the cards that have been played, with the exception of the last card, are shuffled and piled face down to create a new stock, and the game is restarted.

Special Cards

With the exception of the Eights, there are generally additional cards that have particular effects when they are played. The following are some examples of typical rules. Skip As soon as a Queen is played, the next player in the rotation skips a turn and the turn is handed over to the player on the left. In a two-person game the opponent is skipped and the same player plays again. Reverse the flow of events As a result of the Aceis being played, the direction of the game is reversed, becoming anticlockwise if it had previously been clockwise, and vice versa.

  1. Draw a deck of cards Following the play of a Two, the following player must choose between drawing two cards or playing another Two (an Eight cannot be played in this case).
  2. The punishment cards cannot be played in the same turn as the penalty cards are drawn – when the penalty cards are drawn, the turn is passed to the next player, who can continue with any card of the same suit as the last Two, or with another Two or an Eight to change suits.
  3. If the dealt card is an Ace, the game is played in an anticlockwise fashion, with the person to the dealer’s right taking the first turn.
  4. If the first card dealt is a Queen, the first player is the player who is two spaces to the left of the dealer and is dealt the card.
  5. For example, the card on top of the play pile is the 10, and the only card left in the deck for the next player is the 2.
  6. The hands are scored in their current state – no one is required to draw cards as a result of the 2.

Variations

With the addition of modifications, Crazy Eights is one of the most simple games to make your own. For example, choosing a different card, such as Jack instead of Queen to force the next player to miss a turn, or Four instead of Ace to reverse direction are common examples of how the responsibilities of the special cards are altered. Occasionally, there will be additional special cards with additional consequences – for example, it may be decided that the Queen of Spades causes the following player to draw 5 cards after he or she has dealt the first five cards.

Deal

The amount of cards handed to each player at the beginning of the game may vary.

Some players, for example, begin with eight cards apiece.

Drawing Cards

In the usual game, you have the option of using your turn to draw a card at any time. But other players believe that you may only draw if you are unable to participate – if you are capable of participating, you must. The drawn card may be played immediately if it is in fact a permissible play in some jurisdictions. Some games enable you to draw more than one card – either up to a certain number of cards, after which if you are still unable (or unwilling) to play, the turn is passed to the next player, and so on.

Changing Suit

At least in locations where the game is referred to as Crazy Eights, the unique card that changes suit is almost always the number eight (or a variation thereof). For example, the identical game is known by different names in different parts of the world, and a different card may be used to change suits in different forms – for example, the Ace is frequently used to change suits in British game Switch, and the Jack or Seven is used in some other variants. Some players believe that you can only play an Eight if it matches the suit or rank of the preceding card.

After then, the following player must either play a suit matching the eight you played or play another eight.

Some players choose to utilize jacks or aces as the cards with the ability to alter suit rather than eights as the cards with this ability.

Multiple Equal Cards

The player who has two or more equal-ranked cards may play them all at the same time if the first of them is a permitted move, according to the rules of the game. It does not matter if they are special cards or not; all of the special effects will occur. When a 5 is placed at the top of the play pile, the following player has the option of playing the cards 9, 9, and 9 in that sequence, and the next player would be forced to play either the number 9 or the number heart. If both of the equal cards are special cards, then all of the special effects are activated at the same time.

Similarly, a pair of Queens will skip two players (in a two-player game, this would be your opponent’s turn and your own following turn, allowing your opponent to play next).

Last Card

The player who has two or more equal-ranked cards may play them all at the same time if the first of them is a legal move, according to several rules of poker. Special cards have all of the special effects activated, so make sure you have them! When a 5 is placed at the top of the play pile, the following player has the option of playing the cards 9, 9, and 9 in that sequence, and the next player would be forced to play either the 9 or the heart. The special effects will be activated if the equal cards are of the same kind.

Similarly, if a Queen skips the next player, a pair of Queens would skip two players (in a two-person game, this would be your opponent’s turn and your own following turn, allowing your opponent to play first).

If a Two necessitates the selection of two cards by the next player, a pair of Twos necessitates the selection of four cards by the next player (or play another Two).

End of Stock Pile

When the stock pile has been depleted, the rules provided in most books do not contemplate rearranging the play pile in order to create a new stock. Instead, they declare that the game will proceed without the use of a picture. A player who is unable or does not choose to participate just passes. If everyone passes, the game is halted. The game comes to a halt, and everyone receives points for the cards still in their possession. In actuality, I believe that this form of the game is only sometimes played.

Crazy Eights Countdown

This particular variant has gained popularity in North America. Each player begins the game with an 8 on the ten-point scale, and each player is handed eight cards. When a player gets rid of all of his or her cards, the game does not come to a conclusion. rather than adding 1 to their score, the player subtracts 1 from their score and is dealt a whole new hand of cards with a size equal to their new score. Those who have already played their cards maintain their hands and the game continues. The game is won by the first person to lower their score to zero, and this is known as the winner.

In this case, everyone starts with an Eight as their wild card, and the game plays out similarly to a regular Crazy Eights game.

Each time a player runs out of cards, their wild card changes, starting with the number eight and progressing to the number seven, then six, and so on down to the number one.

The shifting wild card creates a number of unique circumstances, and the players must come to an agreement on how to resolve them.

  1. When a wild card is played, the player is given the opportunity to choose a suit. When a card is dealt, it must be either a card from that suit or the player’s own wild card. Whenever a player’s wild card rank is also associated with a special effect, the player nominates a suit, and the suit card also serves as a special effect card in the manner described below:
  • Wild / Skip a beat. The next player is skipped, and the person who comes in after him or her must play the suit that was chosen or a wild card. Imagine, for example, that our house rule is that the number 4 skips the next player, that number 4 is my wild card, and that I play the four nominated diamonds. It is necessary for the following player to play a diamond or one of their own wild cards
  • This is known as Wild / Reverse. The direction is reversed, and the following player in the new direction must play the suit that was nominated, or a wild card, in order to advance. Take, for example, the case in which Aces reverse course. We are playing in a clockwise direction, and I am in charge of nominating spades. The clockwise direction is reversed, and the player to my right must play a spade or one of their own wild cards
  • Wild / Draw Two is the result. The next player must either draw two cards or play a Two of the specified suit before proceeding to the following round. For example, the players are listed in alphabetical order with their scores as A(2), B(5), and C. (6). Player A competes against the two nominated clubs. B must now choose between playing the 2 or drawing two cards. If B plays the two, C must either draw four cards or play any two cards from his hand (since the2 was not wild). If B draws two cards, C must either play a club or a wild 6 or draw a card, because clubs was the suit that A had chosen for C to play. Consider the following scenario: player A is playing the wild2 and nominating diamonds. Given that we are using a single deck of cards, player B will be compelled to draw two cards, and player C will be obliged to play a diamond or a wild card to avoid being eliminated. B’s sole permissible play to avoid drawing two cards when using a double deck would be the other2
  • When using a single deck, B’s only legal move would be the other1.

Crazy-8-Countdown is the subject of a blog post and subsequent conversation. In this variation, Jacks pass over the next player, Twos force the next player to draw two cards or play another Two as normal, and the Queen of Spades forces the next player to draw five cards. It is possible to play multiple cards of the same rank at the same time. There is no mention of a’reverse direction’ card. When numerous cards are played in a single turn, and some or all of them are special cards, the special effects apply even to cards that are covered, just as they do in normal Crazy Eights.

In certain groups, a card of equivalent rank can be played on a wild card even if it is not in the designated suit, and this is known as the variant.

This rule is the most frequently cited source of disagreement in this game, thus it is a good idea to agree on whether or not this type of play is permitted by your house rules in advance.

Other variants described on this and other websites

See the following pages on our website for further information:

  • A description of crates provided by Richard Hussong
  • Bruce McCosar describes spoons as follows: Mark Alexander provided the last contribution. Bartok, a game in which the rules are changed during the course of the game
  • It is not permitted to discuss the rules in Mao’s presence.

More pages containing the rules of Crazy Eights variations may be found at:

  • One variation of Crazy Eights, played in Puerto Rico, is described by Jose M. Carrillo-Muniz
  • Another variation, Jack Change, is described by Justin Tuijl (archive copy)
  • And a third variation, Jack Change, is described by Jose M. Carrillo-Muniz (archive copy). The rules of Huit Américain are available on Jean-François Bustarret’s website in French. An explanation of a French Canadian version known as Huit(eight) may be found on the website Cribbage.ca. Detailed rules for Crazy Eights may be found on the Card Game Heaven website.

In the Invented Games part of this website, you can find several Crazy Eights versions that have been submitted by readers. There have been several commercial versions of the game of eights, each of which was meant to be played with specially created packs of playing cards. Uno is probably the most well-known of them, and there are several versions that have been created for it.

Crazy Eights software and online games

One of the games in the HOYLE Card Gamesfor Windows or Mac OS Xcollection is Crazy Eights, which is among a slew of other widely recognized card games. TrapApps provides online versions of a variety of Crazy Eights variations, each slightly different from the other: Crazy Eights, Crazy Eights Zimbabwean, Irish Switch, Jacks, Twos, and Eights, Last Card, Macao, Macau London, One-Card, Pesten, Puskiyon, Switch, Switch Black Jack, and Take Two are all variations of the game Crazy Eights, Crazy Eights Zimbabwean, Irish Switch, Jacks, Twos, and Eights.

  • In addition, there is a Countdown to the Crazy Eights.
  • Card Games Galore offers Malcolm Bain’s shareware game Agony for Windows, which is a Greek variant of Crazy Eights that may be downloaded for free.
  • Using Solitaire.com, you may play Crazy Eights or the related Dutch gamePesten or German gameMau Mau versus a computer opponent online against the server.
  • In addition to cards, Mike’s Cards contains a Crazy Eights application for both Macintosh and PC systems.
  • Unique Games offers the Crazy Eights Deluxe game, which can be purchased online.
  • Gameslush.com provides an online Crazy Eights game where users may compete against live opponents or computer opponents.
  • Einar Egilsson has made a free JavaCrazy Eights application available for download, which allows you to play against a single computer opponent online.
See also:  How to Play War Card Game - Rules & Strategies

How to Play Crazy Eights

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation Crazy Eights is a card game in which the participants attempt to eliminate all of their cards. Perhaps you’re already familiar with this game by one of its unofficial names, such as Eights or Swedish Rummy. No matter what you call it, you’ll just need a conventional 52-card deck to play with a party of five or fewer people, but you can easily accommodate more players by adding a second deck.

  1. 1 Shuffle the cards and give them out. Remove the cards from a standard 52-card deck and properly shuffle them. Deal cards to each player one at a time, starting with the person to your left, until all players have received a card. Each participant will be dealt eight cards.
  • Crazy Eights (as well as most other card games) always begins with the player to the left of the dealer, and the cards are dealt from left to right. If there are only two players in total, instead of the normal eight cards, just seven cards are dealt. Earlier, it was stated that if there are more than five players, two decks should be combined together.

2Put the remaining cards in the center of the table. When each player has eight cards in hand, place the remaining cards face down in the center of the playing area to complete the game. The draw pile is made up of these cards. If you are unable to play a card, you will draw from the remaining cards until you find one that can be played. Advertisement 3Turn over a card from the draw pile to create the discard pile. You should conclude dealing by turning over the top card in the draw pile and placing it beside the pile.

If an 8 is the first card drawn from the draw pile, rearrange the pile and turn over a fresh beginning card.

To get rid of a card, players must either match the rank (4, 10, K, A.) or suit (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, A.) with a single card in their hand or discard the card. This card is put on top of the discard pile, and the turn is passed to the player to the left of the current player.

  • As with other typical card games, including Crazy Eights, the player to the left of the dealer is the first to play a card once the cards have been dealt
  • 8s serve as wild cards in this particular game of chance. Whenever you play an 8, you’ll be required to announce the new suit. Some variants of Crazy Eights prohibit players from ending their turn on the number 8.

5 When you have no playable cards in your hand, you should draw cards. You can draw cards from the draw pile until you have a playable card if you don’t already have any matching cards in your hand. After that, you’ll play the card and then proceed as you normally would.

  • Some players limit the number of cards that can be drawn every turn to one. The draw rules are frequently established by the preferences of the players.

6Continue to deal cards one by one until a player has none remaining. Once the player to the left of the dealer has played a single card, the turn is passed to the person to the left of the dealer who plays one card. When playing in this manner, players discard one card at a time (or draw until they are able to discard another card). When a player has no more cards in their hand, the hand is said to be over. 7 If the draw pile is depleted, it will be necessary to count points to determine the winner.

In the game Crazy Eights, this is a game-ending circumstance.

  • Numbered cards (including aces) are valued the same amount as the number of pips on their backs (including aces). The court cards (J, Q, and K) are worth ten points each in this game. With a value of 50 points, the 8s reallyarecrazy
  • The winning player in this case obtains a winning score equal to the difference between their hand’s score and the scores of the other players’ hands.

8 Calculate your hand’s score and proceed to the next round of play. When a player has exhausted his or her supply of cards, the hand is ended. Each player is responsible for calculating the point value of the cards still in their possession. The winner of the hand adds the final point totals for each of the players to their total point overall for the hand.

  • Remember that numbered cards (including aces) equal the amount of pips, court cards equal 10, and 8s equal 50 points.

9 Shuffle the cards and continue to play until a player reaches or surpasses the point target. The number of players in the game determines the quantity of points that may be earned. After each hand, the cards are reshuffled, and the game continues until a player meets or exceeds the following milestones:

  • 100 points for two players
  • 150 points for three players
  • 200 points for four players
  • 250 points for five players
  • And so on.
  1. 1 Increase the number of cards in the beginning hand from the current number. The number of cards in your opening hand determines how long the game will last. While this will lessen your draw pile, it may have the reverse effect and shorten your game as a result of your actions. As a result, you may choose to mix two decks of cards in order to play.
  • When adding new cards to your Crazy Eights deck, use cards that have the same design as the cards you already have to avoid counting cards. Add your second deck to the first by shuffling the cards together in the same manner as you would with the first. To shuffle the cards, take your time – because there are more cards, it might be tough

2Assign insane actions to certain cards in your deck. This update to the game is a fantastic representation of its crazy and zany personality. There’s no limit to what you can come up with; for example, you might tell to players at the start of the game that if they get a 3, they must run around the table three times. 3 Players should announce when they are down to their final card. This rule is similar to the game of Uno in that players must proclaim when they have reached the end of their hand of cards.

  • Some players may believe this to be a normal rule in their game. This rule is frequently accompanied by a penalty: for example, if you fail to announce your final card, you must draw two cards

4 Make a decision on which offensive draw card or cards to use. It is possible to use them to “attack” the person who comes after you by forcing that opponent to draw cards. Aces are forced to be drawn in one-card draws, while twos are forced to be drawn in two-card draws, as an example.

  • When a player has just one card remaining, offensive cards can be used to compel him or her to draw more cards, preventing them from winning the game.

5 Select a blocker card to use in order to prevent the drawing of cards. Sometimes offensive draw cards may get out of hand, especially if one player has a large number of them in their hand. Blocker cards have the potential to level the playing field. After a draw card has been played, play blocker cards to negate the impact of the draw card.

  • The tens and jacks are effective as blocker cards. To put it another way, it’s a little hazardous to hang on to these cards, since if you’re stuck with one at the end, it’ll be worth 10 points against you.
  1. 1 Recognize the many elements of this variant of Crazy Eights that are unique to it. For this Zimbabwean variant of Crazy Eights, all of the usual Crazy Eights rules apply. The most significant distinction is that special powers are available on cards other than 8s.
  • There are three sorts of special powers for cards: offensive, shifting, and defensive
  • Offensive abilities are the most common.

2 Provide players with an explanation of offensive cards.

By drawing a set number of cards from their hand, offensive cards make it more difficult for the person who receives them to win the game. When a 2 is played, the following player is forced to draw two cards. When the Queen of Spades is played, the following player is forced to draw five cards.

  • If an offensive card is placed on top of an offensive card, some players may allow forced draws to skip a person if the card is offensive. For example, if the first player played a 2, the second player may lay another 2, resulting in a four-card draw down the line.

3 Make a list of the cards that are changing and explain them. The sequence in which cards are played is altered when cards are shifted. The fours, the Jacks, and the Kings are the three most important moving cards. 4s change the direction of play from left to right, or vice versa, depending on the situation. Jacks are able to skip the turn of the following player. You can play two cards and continue your turn if you have a king on your side.

  • If the game’s typical direction is to the left, the ball will always go to the left. This direction is reversed until another four is played. If a player who has been skipped by a Jack also happens to have another Jack, certain rules enable the skipped player to utilize the Jack he or she was skipped by. There are two players bypassed as a result of this – or maybe more, depending on how many Jacks are played
  • You can discard two cards in a single turn if you have a king. There are players who insist on a card following the king being of the same suit while others allow any card to follow the king regardless of suit.

4Draw attention to the significance of aces in defense. In this Zimbabwean variant of Crazy Eights, the only defense cards are aces and aces only. Following the play of an aggressive card, the following player has the option of playing any ace to nullify the effect of the forced draw. Advertisement Create a new question

  • Question Is it possible to substitute an eight for the present suit? If you have an eight in your hand and neither the suit that is now being played in your hand nor the same number on the card with a different suit, you can play an eight
  • However, you must do it with caution. Question What is the minimum number of points a player must have in order to win? The individual who is the first to be eliminated wins. When you complete playing a game, the player who has the fewest points at the end of the game wins. Question What should I do if I just have one card left in my hand? When you realize you just have one card left, announce “final card” as soon as you notice it. If you are able to use that card, take advantage of the opportunity. If you are unable to do so, you must choose a card from the stock and continue choosing cards until you are able to play
  • Question Can I put down an ace if someone else has put down a king? (There is no follow-up suit.) You can only follow with the ace if the suit of the king is the same as the suit of the ace. Unless the previous card is an 8, the new card must match either the number/letter or the suit of the previous card. Question What happens when there are two players and both jacks are played by the same player? Who gets to go first? If player A plays two jacks, it is player A’s turn to go first in the game. He began by playing a “skip B,” which signaled the beginning of his turn, and then another “skip B.” Question Is it possible to put down more than one card if they are all of the same suit, number, or both? If the numbers are the same, then yes. Suppose you have a seven of hearts down and you also have a four of hearts and a four of clubs down. You can place both down with the hearts on top. You must first place the heart underneath the suit to indicate that it is matching, and then place the club on top to indicate that the suit has changed. Question Do you have to pick up 5 cards if you have a queen of spades? The decision on whether or not to include this as a house rule should be made with the people you’ll be playing with before the game begins itself. If everyone agrees, then yes, you do need to pick up five dollars. Question In the case of a suit being laid and you possess both the suit and an eight, can you choose to play the eight rather than the suit? Yes, you can play the eight at any point during your turn, regardless of whether or not you have any other options. Question When you have two Jokers in your deck, what does each of them accomplish? Because Jokers have no effect in our games, we do not include them. You can, however, create your own variation in which the Joker card serves as a’skip your turn’ card or something along those lines
  • Question What is the difference between legal cards and wild cards? You can put down legal cards during your turn of play if you have them in your hand. Generally speaking, wild cards are cards that are used when you do not have a legal card, such as an 8.

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Summary of the ArticleXCrazy Eights is a card game for 2-5 people in which players compete to get rid of all of their cards first while scoring the fewest number of points possible. The game begins with the dealer dealing 5 cards face down to each player, starting with the first player. The remaining cards are placed in the center of the table for the draw pile, and the top card is flipped face up next to the pile of remaining cards. The player on the left of the dealer is the first to go. During a player’s turn, they must place a card from their hand on the discard pile at the top of the deck.

For example, if the top card in the deck is the 5 of spades, the player may discard any spade or 5 from their existing hand.

If they draw a card that they think they might be able to use, they must put it on the discard pile.

Eights are wild cards that can be used on top of any other card in the deck.

The game proceeds in a clockwise direction until one of the players has exhausted their supply of cards in their hand.

Each point is equal to one point, face cards are equal to ten points, eights are equal to fifty points, and all other cards are equal to their face value.

At that time, the game is won by the player who has the fewest amount of points.

Continue reading to find more about game modifications, such as attributing a different wild action to various cards in the deck! Did you find this overview to be helpful? The writers of this page have together authored a page that has been read 387,897 times.

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